Nov 20 Mon David Hockney, 80, Major Retrospective at the Met

Large Interior - by David Hockney

Large Interior – by David Hockney

For nearly 60 years, David Hockney (British, born 1937) has pursued a singular career with a love for painting and its intrinsic challenges. This major retrospective—the exhibition’s only North American venue—will honor the artist in his 80th year by presenting his most iconic works and key moments of his career from 1960 to the present.

Working in a wide range of media with equal measures of wit and intelligence, Hockney has examined, probed, and questioned how to capture the perceived world of movement, space, and time in two dimensions. The exhibition will offer a grand overview of the artist’s achievements across all media, including painting, drawing, photography, and video. From his early experiments with modernist abstraction and mid-career experiments with illusion and realism, to his most recent, jewel-toned landscapes, Hockney has consistently explored the nature of perception and representation with both intellectual rigor and sheer delight in the act of looking.

The exhibition is made possible in part by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Jay Pritzker Foundation, the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund, and the Aaron I. Fleischman and Lin Lougheed Fund.

It is supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

It is organized collaboratively by Tate Britain, London; the Centre Pompidou, Paris; and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 999

Exhibition Dates: November 27, 2017–February 25, 2018
Exhibition Location: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Galleries, Gallery 999

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Nov 18 Sat 7pm Filling a great hall magnificently: 550 Singers including 300 schoolchildren in Mahler’s Eighth and Rollo Dilworth Premiere at Carnegie Hall

Magnificent Choral Event

Magnificent Choral Event

Mahler Symphony No 8 and Bound for Glory by Dilworth

Mahler Symphony No 8 and Bound for Glory by Dilworth

Resounding triumph of sound and musicality
Last night it was hard to imagine a more splendidly rich and yet softly beautiful sound filling Carnegie Hall than the combined forces of the orchestra, the Canterbury choir on the great stage and the ranks of the many school children filling two levels of the fabled hall above the heads of the parquet audience as they played and sang the first part of Mahler’s tremendous Eighth, yet the two major works which bookended the first section of this most huge and renowned of Mahler’s works in this extraordinary concert were perhaps the most pleasing of the evening, namely the premiere of Rollo Dilworth’s Bound For Glory, a set of works based on folk songs and the most famous spirituals of his African-American heritage, featuring his superb orchestration of This Train is Bound for Glory and four other works which proved Dilworth’s amazing grace in substituting classical music’s expansive armory of violins, brass and timpani and a massed choir for the more basic instruments and small human congregations that gave them birth, revealing how they ranked with the greatest music in any form, and then after the intermission the long finale of the evening was the second part of the Eighth, Mahler’s scoring of the final scene from Goethe’s Faust, Part II, an abridgment which is still huge in power and length and yet which like Rollo Dilworth’s masterwork also spoke to the ear and heart more convincingly than the at times overly dramatic first part of the Eighth, completing Mahler’s seminal masterpiece whose premiere was the high point of his career, featuring a quieter and more accessible appeal possibly because Mahler was the greatest opera conductor of his day, and also perhaps because it is generally less demanding of the soloists in the upper register, and possibly also because conductor Jonathan de Vries seemed to have had the vast numbers of soloists, instrumentalists and voices high and low in hand more completely than in the great but very demanding first part of the symphony, but whatever the reasons for any differences certainly the upshot was that all three works made for what has to be one of the most stirring, interesting and satisfying evenings that the great acoustics of the hall have served for some time. – AL

CANTERBURY CELEBRATES 65 TH ANNIVERSARY WITH PERFORMANCE OF MAHLER’S EIGHTH SYMPHONY AND WORLD PREMIERE OF WORK BY ROLLO DILWORTH – 550 SINGERS INCLUDING 300 CHILDREN WILL PERFORM

For the first time in its 65-year history, Canterbury Choral Society, under the baton of conductor Jonathan De Vries, has commissioned a new choral work by a prominent American contemporary composer, Rollo Dilworth.

On November 18, 2017 at 7pm Canterbury Choral Society and Monmouth Civic Chorus will perform Gustav Mahler’s magnificent Eighth Symphony in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall in New York. They will be joined by over 300 children from 9 schools and churches in the City.

Composer Rollo Dilworth

Composer Rollo Dilworth

In addition, composer Rollo Dilworth has written a choral piece, “Bound for Glory”especially for the occasion.

“This is a five-movement work that celebrates the influences of African musicaltraditions on Am erican folk tunes, European melodies and the African America spiritual. These genres of music communicate the common themes of faith, hope and perseverance,” says Dilworth.

Gustav Mahler’s Eighth Symphony, known as “The Symphony of a Thousand”, requires elaborate staging and a double adult chorus. The children provide the angelic “heavenly” voices.

“Canterbury has a long history of children singing in choral concerts. We commissioned Rollo Dilworth’s work to commemorate that tradition” says Conductor Jonathan De Vries. “The idea of a Faustian journey of redemption is where this concept first began. The feeling of a heavenly journey in both Mahler and Dilworth’s work is exciting to consider. “

Soloists participating are: Angela Fout, Jennifer Grimaldi and Jolle Greenleaf, Sopra nos, Fredrika Brillembourg and Sara Murphy, Mezzo-Sopranos; John Matthew Myers, Tenor, Sidney Outlaw, Bass-Baritone and Matthew Anchel, Bass.

CANTERBURY CELEBRATES 65TH ANNIVERSARY WITH PERFORMANCE OF MAHLER’S EIGHTH SYMPHONY AND WORLD PREMIERE OF WORK BY ROLLO DILWORTH 550 SINGERS INCLUDING 300 CHILDREN WILL PERFORM

CANTERBURY CELEBRATES 65TH ANNIVERSARY WITH PERFORMANCE OF MAHLER’S EIGHTH SYMPHONY AND WORLD PREMIERE OF WORK BY ROLLO DILWORTH 550 SINGERS INCLUDING 300 CHILDREN WILL PERFORM

A 300-voice children’s choir will join in the performance. Young choristers from five New York area schools, and youth choral groups from four churches will sing. The schools include Brearley, Spence, St. Hilda’s and St. Hugh’s, Trevor Day, Kaufman Music Center; the churches are the Church of the Heavenly Rest, St. Bartholomew’s, Trinity Church Wall Street, and New Amsterdam Boys and Girls Choir in New York City.

Mahler’s Eighth Symphony is in two movements. The first is a setting of the 9 th Century Latin hymn Veni Creator Spiritus. The second movement is sung in German and is taken from Goethe’s Faust Part Two, published posthumously in 1832.

Almost all of the Eighth Symphony was created by Austrian composer Gustav Mahler in the summer of 1906. Inspiration came to him quite suddenly in his studio. “It was a vision that struck me like lightning—-the whole immediately before my eyes. I had only to write it down, as though it has just been dictated to me,” he wrote. Mahler not only composed new music for the medieval hymn, but conceived of the conceptual link to Goethe’s Faust, joining the texts together in an innovative symphony that borrowed elements from sacred oratorio and dramatic opera.

Tickets for Canterbury Choral Society’s performance of Mahler’s Eighth Symphony are now on sale at the Carnegie Hall Box Office at 57th Street and Seventh Avenue, at www.carnegiehall.org , or by calling Carnegie Charge at 212-247- 7800. Prices range from $35 to $100.

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Nov 17 Fri Molly Barnes Presents Dealer George Billis of LA and NYC and Red Dot Art Fair in Miami

Bruce Everett

The George Billis Gallery is an exhibition space with locations in New York City and Los Angeles.

After establishing a successful contemporary art gallery in New York, George Billis opened his Los Angeles gallery in 2004. With galleries in Chelsea and Culver City, George Billis Gallery provides a dynamic exchange of contemporary artists between the art centers of New York and Los Angeles. The gallery shows painting, photography, sculpture, and mixed media works and is dedicated predominantly to exhibiting emerging to mid-career artists with a focus on Southern California artists.

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Nov 16 Thu Noon-2pm Molly Barnes Presents Marilyn Church, Painter and Court Sketch Artist, at Roger Smith

EDGEOFSILENCE38X56ACRYLICMARILYNCHURCH

EDGEOFSILENCE38X56ACRYLICMARILYNCHURCH

Nov 16 Thu Noon-2pm Molly Barnes Presents Marilyn Church, Court Sketch Artist and Painter, at Roger Smith

My focus and fascination is the abstraction of the figure – a continuous theme throughout my career as an artist.
The figure and its emotional impact always resonated for me as a courtroom artist and found its way into my work as a fine artist.
But in my painting and mixed media works, I am freed from any boundaries and am more open to intuition, dream images and improvisation.
In this process of discovery, a narrative eventually emerges, however illusive it appears. It is often cloaked in mystery, eroticism and ambiguity.

Marilyn Church , May 2015

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Nov 14 Tue 10am AMNH Our Senses: An Immersive Experience

The AMNH will play with your senses

The AMNH will play with your senses

Fun challenges can teach how the brain can be fooled

In the Wavy Room, the floor and walls seem to be less than flat, but they are not

The tricks our senses play upon our minds may be the most interesting aspect of this diverting and thorough survey of how the senses form our perceptions with the help of the brain, in particular a display towards the end of the 11 room array of different activities from Seeing, Detecting, Hearing to Touch and Smelling where the Wavy Room, whose walls and floor are covered with a network of distorting lines that will disorient your sense of balance, leads into “Correcting”, another ‘exploration room’, a gallery of exhibits which “demonstrate the role of the brain in processing sensory information to construct its view of the world”, where one wall display presents an image of a checkerboard partly in the shadow of an object,

According to Rob DeSalle, the curator of the AMNH’s Or Senses. squares A and B are the same shade and if we think not, our brain is playing a trick – but our camera seems to prove him wrong!

where the alternating squares are all in fact the same alternating tonal density of light or dark, but where your brain will insist on interpreting one dark square in the shadow as lighter than another dark square outside the shadow, and despite the statement accompanying it which explains the phenomenon is an illusion, you will find your brain will refuse to correct the impression, however long you look, but don’t make the mistake of thinking that curator Rob Desalle of Invertebrate Zoology has got it wrong, but instead accept it as powerful evidence of how much the brain can distort our understanding of what we are witnessing, as it attempts to correct a sensory impression by creating a misleading one,

Rob should know – he oversaw the Brain:The Inside Story earlier – but your brain may still challenge his guidance that square A is the same color as Square B!

even though your camera shows otherwise, which together with other examples in this room will teach why eye witness accounts are so often mistaken in court cases and must not be treated as gospel, a theme which is taken up on the Museum’s science website for kids, OLogy, where there is now Trip Up Your Brain, a feature on optical illusions and what they reveal about the human brain and our evolutionary past.

Perhaps this shot will persuade you that your brain is changing what you perceive to suit your preconceptions - the separate piece matching A placed on the B square now seems to match its darker tone.

Perhaps this shot will persuade you that your brain is changing what you perceive to suit your preconceptions – the separate piece matching A placed on the B square now seems to match its darker tone.

(AMNH:) Every day, we perceive the world around us through some or all of our senses—including sight, smell, hearing, touch, taste, and balance. Every ring of the alarm clock, whiff of breakfast, or step on a cold tile floor—all are detected by specialized sensory cells that send nerve signals to your brain. But as it turns out, for humans “reality” isn’t ever exactly what it seems to be. In an upcoming highly experiential exhibition at the Museum, funhouse-like spaces will dare visitors to trust their senses—then show how or why what we perceive is not simply what is occurring around us.

Our Senses: An Immersive Experience delves into how our brains, adapted over millennia to help our ancestors survive their environments, work with sensory organs to shape and reframe our perceptions of everyday encounters. And it reveals how until recently in our evolutionary history, humans have been oblivious to nature’s other ubiquitous signals, including UV light, infrared sounds, and electrical fields. With the advent of new technologies, scientists now know those signals are all around us—just not perceptible to us through our senses alone.

Our Senses will let visitors explore eleven interactive galleries designed to test our perceptions. A room with changing lights will reveal a series of different images depending on which light—red, blue, or green—shines at any given moment. Another space—this time in black and white—will let visitors discover what happens when our senses disagree: the eyes will see walls and a floor that appear to curve and ripple but the feet will feel a flat surface beneath. (Some visitors may feel off balance, but will be able to bypass the gallery if they prefer.)

Other exhibition highlights include a garden that can be explored through the eyes of a bee or a butterfly, revealing what other animals see when they encounter flowering plants; an audio collage challenging visitors to test their skill at tracking individual sounds, a real-time demonstration of how your brain’s primary task is to sort through the stimulating world around you and select the right information on which to focus your attention; and a variety of experiences that showcase how our brains are wired to prioritize certain signals and focus on particular cues and details, such as movement or human faces. A smell test will invite visitors to unpack the fragrance notes in a complex scent, since what we perceive as a particular odor is actually a symphony of smells. A section on attention will focus on how seemingly unrelated information can shape what you see and hear—and how, when focusing on one item, other, obvious items may be missed. Other areas of the exhibition will delve into how our brain works to create our perception of “reality” by filling in gaps, resolving conflicts, correcting errors, and using scraps of information to trigger memories.

In addition, a live presentation will address why our senses are essential to our survival, how the senses and world views of other species differ from ours, and what’s truly unique about human perception, including sensory integration, language, art, and music.

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Nov 13 Mon 7pm Tina Brown at Barnes and Noble 86th St

Tina Brown on Vanity Fair and NYC in the Eighties

Tina Brown on Vanity Fair and NYC in the Eighties

Tina Brown
The Vanity Fair Diaries: 1983 – 1992
Band N Author Event (Biography)
Monday November 13, 2017 7:00 PM
Lex/East 86 St

Tina Brown’s delicious daily diaries kept throughout her eight spectacular years as editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair provide an incendiary portrait of the flash and dash and power brokering of the excessive Eighties in New York and Hollywood. Here are the inside stories of Vanity Fair scoops and covers that sold millions as Brown triumphantly reinvented the failing magazine.

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Nov 13 Mon 10 am–noon Norwegian Edvard Munch Reassessed at Met Breuer (Nov 15-Feb 4)

Edvard Munch. Self Portrait between the Clock and the Bed, 1940–43. Oil on canvas. Munch Museum, Oslo.

Edvard Munch. Self Portrait between the Clock and the Bed, 1940–43. Oil on canvas. Munch
Museum, Oslo.

Edvard Munch’s Career is Reassessed in Met Breuer Exhibition

Exhibition Dates:
November 15, 2017–February 4, 2018
Exhibition Location:
The Met Breuer, Floor 3

Although Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863–1944) attained notoriety early in his career for his haunting depictions of human anxiety and alienation that reflected modern experience, he believed that his artistic breakthrough occurred around 1913 at the age of 50.Throughout his career, Munch regularly revisited subjects from his earlier years, exploring them with renewed inspiration and intensity. Self Portrait: Between the Clock and the Bed (1940–43) was one of his final such works and it serves as a lens to reassess Munch’s oeuvre. Opening November 15 at The Met Breuer, the exhibition Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed will feature 43 of the artist’s compositions created over a span of six decades, including 16 self-portraits and works that have never before been seen in the United States.
The exhibition is made possible by Leonard A. Lauder.

It is supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and The Munch Museum, Oslo.

Exhibition Overview

The thematic arrangement of the exhibition will reveal the frequency with which Munch revisited and reworked certain subjects. It will present him as an artist who was as revolutionary in the 20th century, as he was when he made a name for himself in the Symbolist era. Major themes and motifs of Munch’s last paintings can be traced back to his earlier works. Displaying his early and late works together allows visitors to identify innovations in composition, treatment, and technique.
The first canvas in the exhibition—Self Portrait: Between the Clock and the Bed—is also one of the last works the artist painted. It will serve as a touchstone and guide to the other works on view. This remarkable painting shows the artist’s bedroom, with a door opening to the studio beyond. The artist stands emotionless between the grandfather clock, which—having no face or hands—exists outside of time, and the bed, in which the span of a human’s life takes place.
Fifteen other self-portraits—a category to which Munch returned often—follow the artist’s path from youth to old age. These fascinating “self-scrutinies” as Munch called them are, by turns, documentary, confessional, psychological, and fictionalized.
Seven works in the exhibition will be shown in the United States for the first time: Lady in Black (1891); Puberty (1894); Jealousy (1907); Death Struggle (1915); Man with Bronchitis (1920); Self-Portrait with Hands in Pockets (1925-26), and Ashes (1925). Also on view will be Sick Mood at Sunset, Despair (1892)—the earliest depiction and compositional genesis of The Scream, one of the most recognizable images in modern art—which is being displayed outside of Europe for only the second time in its history.
The exhibition will include many deeply personal works from Munch’s own collection, now held by the Munch Museum, as well as works from institutions and private lenders from around the world. The paintings demonstrate Munch’s liberated, self-assured painting style as well as his technical abilities, including bravura brushwork, innovative compositional structures, the incorporation of visceral scratches and marks on the canvas, and his exceptional use of intense, vibrant color.

About the Artist

Born and raised in Norway, Edvard Munch was one of the most celebrated and controversial artists of his generation. With only brief formal training in painting, Munch was largely self-taught. He was a prolific artist, creating approximately 1,750 paintings, 18,000 prints, and 4,500 watercolors, in addition to sculpture, graphic art, theater design, and film. Munch was associated with the Symbolist and Expressionist movements and their legacies. He exhibited widely throughout Europe, affecting the trajectory of modernism in France, Germany, and Norway. His influence can be seen in the work of such artists as Georg Baselitz, Marlene Dumas, Katharina Grosse, Asger Jorn, Bridget Riley, and Jasper Johns, among others.
Credits

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Nov 6 Mon 10am–2pm Michelangelo, Divine Draftsman and Designer: Landmark Exhibition at Met (Nov 13 Mon, 2017–Feb 12 Mon, 2018)


How the Genius of Michelangelo Unfolded
Curator Carmen Bernbach took eight years to put together this unique exposition of how this most celebrated artist of the physically and spiritually sublime put it all together in his extraordinary 88 years, attaining the ideal of beauty so perfectly from prodigious inspiration in conception and drawing to execution in paint, marble and even verse, inspiring others with his designs to work with him or follow him as he achieved the greatest figure representations in history of male nudes, always his obsession as he loved and befriended the finest gentiluomini amici, or young gentlemen of the Florentine aristocracy, and fellow artists with work that redirected Western art toward more expression in a life that was ruled by mind and heart, including faith in God, for Michelangelo notoriously paid no attention to food or any other bodily appetite, according to contemporaries, as he shared his genius.

Description from the Met: Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from November 13, 2017, through February 12, 2018, will present a stunning range and number of works by the artist: 128 of his drawings, 3 of his marble sculptures, his earliest painting, and his wood architectural model for a chapel vault. A substantial body of complementary works by his teachers, associates, pupils, and artists who were influenced by him or who worked in collaboration with him will also be displayed for comparison and context.

A towering genius in the history of Western art, Michelangelo was celebrated during his long life for the excellence of his disegno, the power of drawing and invention that provided the foundation for all of the arts. For his mastery of drawing, design, sculpture, painting, and architecture, he was called Il divino (“the divine one”) by his contemporaries. His powerful imagery and dazzling technical virtuosity transported viewers and imbued all of his works with a staggering force that continues to enthrall us today.

“This is an exceptionally rare opportunity to experience first-hand the unique genius of Michelangelo,” said Daniel H. Weiss, President and CEO of The Met. “The exhibition will display the magnificent beauty of Michelangelo’s works in order to deepen our understanding of his creative process.”

Selected from 50 public and private collections in the United States and Europe, the exhibition will bring together the largest group of original drawings by Michelangelo ever assembled for public display. Many of the drawings rank among the greatest works of draftsmanship produced. Extraordinary and rare international loans will include the complete series of masterpiece drawings he created for his friend Tommaso de’Cavalieri and a monumental cartoon for his last fresco in the Vatican Palace.

Dr. Carmen C. Bambach, curator of the exhibition, commented: “This selection of more than 200 works will show that Michelangelo’s imagery and drawings still speak with an arresting power today. Five hundred years seem to melt away in looking at his art.”

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Nov 4 Sat 3-5pm Harney and Sons Present Tip Top Athleteas at SoHo house, 433 Broome St

With the huge array of choice tea blends on the wall, the three globes of AthleTeas are lined up for tasting on the counter of a crowded store

With the huge array of choice tea blends on the wall, the three globes of AthleTeas are lined up for tasting on the counter of a crowded store


Tea lovers gather at Harney’s to taste Athleteas for athletes, latest three of over 250 blends

Harney’s in Soho is a rich resource for tea lovers, presenting for tasting, purchase or sit down enjoyment leaves from sources in India, China and Ceylon and as far flung as Rwanda or even Italy (dried olive leaves from the South) mixed into over two hundred and fifty inventive but rich and always tasteful blends from Sally’s Secret black tea with its notes of Black Pepper and Rosepetal to the distinctly earthy but still delicate Rwanden RuGeri, a tea benefiting from the slow processing possible in Rwanda which escapes the humidity and heat of India, to Osmanthus Oolong, with its tiny flowers from Fujian Province in China turned into a heap of particles which yield such a dense tea that it can be infused more than once as its flavor develops.

Tasting at Harney's demands full attention to the subtleties of expert blending

Tasting at Harney’s demands full attention to the subtleties of expert blending

This afternoon’s event marked the new partnership between Harney’s and Dr Mara Smith, a specialist in tutoring Olympic athletes how to train their bodies with the right mental attitude to reach peak performance, by presenting three different new ‘Athleteas’ for sampling at the tasting counter of Harney’s long and recently efficiently remodeled retail space which is on the south side of Broome Street just East of Broadway. The middle of the extensive wooden counter featured three glowing rosy round globes of AthleTea, one for ‘performance’ with caffeine (orange mango) and one for ‘performance’ without caffeine (Get Your Passion Berry AthleTea) and one for ‘recovery’ without caffeine (the soothing Go to Goji).

Dr. Mara Smith designed her new blends for Harneys to enhance athletes mindfulness of past and future performance

Dr. Mara Smith designed her new blends for Harneys to enhance athletes mindfulness of past and future performance

All this according to Mara, a warm, lively woman in sturdy black spectacles who believes that tea drinking is the way for high performing athletes “to carve out time for reflection on past progress and to focus forward” on future accomplishment, and is working with many athletes who now wish to move from health drinks toward tea. Of course this should appeal as well to all healthy people who are not actually athletes, she says, since as the Nike saying has it “If you have a body you are an athlete!”

Apart from the large canisters of specialty teas that line the wall behind the serving counter in a solid block of 250 teas, Harney’s has a small space at the back for people to sit with tea or even coffee (recently added) and a slew of intriguing extras to buy lining the wall opposite, including “Homesick” candles to remind one of home, tumblers with inscriptions like NEW YORK HOME, decorated mugs especially for “Little Miss Busy”, “Mr Grumpy”, “Little Miss Chatterbox” and other children, attractive leaf motif tote bags, and black baseball caps with legends front and rear (“Hello with “Goodbye”, or “Books” with “Join The Club” , or “This is Tea” and “Harneys”.)

Tea consultant Mila presents the three AthleTeas now available to make you pause and be mindful of past and future considerations in your athletic progress

Tea enthusiast Michele presents the three AthleTeas now available to make you pause and be mindful of past and future considerations in your athletic progress

Mousing the Google map of Harney’s location on Broome just East of Broadway in Soho (take the Lex subway to Spring) and you notice that there is no listing for thousands of Yelp or Google reviews as for other much less notable places. Yet there are often crowds outside the doors when it opens at 10.30am daily (closes 6.30pm)

Evidently Harneys is discreetly British in style in selling itself as well as its tea by relying on word of mouth to advertise its top tea level social and commercial presence, for as the cap says, truly “This is Tea, Harneys”. Yet in only seven years it has established this, still the only offshoot of its home base in Millerton, in upstate New York, as indeed the tea place in New York par excellence.

Emeric Harney has remodeled the store into a beautifully efficient system for selling his top teas, and plans to expand the seating for those who wish to sample them along with crumbly scones with clotted cream right then and there

Emeric Harney has remodeled the store into a beautifully efficient system for selling his top teas, and plans to expand the seating for those who wish to sample them along with crumbly scones with clotted cream right then and there

One can only hope that, as Emeric Harney the third generation owner of this flagship in fashionable Soho now crowded with visitors from foreign countries where tea is often more established than here, says is the plan, Harneys expands the size and comfort of its restricted seating area to a level consonant with its leadership of what one hopes will be a continuing advance of the more enlightened and healthy alternative to coffee in too caffeine addicted New York City.

————————————
PR notification: Attention fun fit New Yorkers!
Harney & Sons is hosting a launch party for their NEW Athletea Saturday before the New York marathon!
…and we want YOU to come
Tea masters Harney & Sons will be filling your cups with fitness-minded tea blends.
Food provided by the grand French Lafayette Café & Bakery
Special guest Dr. Mara Smith, founder of AthleteMinder and mental strength consultant to Olympic and World medal-winning athletes.

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October 25 Wed-28 Sat Photoplus 2017 Javits

Smaller but higher quality show outpaces smartphone threat

Fuji and Tamron win prizes and supporters

Panasonic Lumix quietly outshines Nikon and Canon

All eyes on the biggest and baddest photoexpo in the world

Largest Photography Conference and Expo in North America

Photoplus 2017 is upon us and there is much to look forward to in the evolving technology of the high quality hand held camera in the face of increasing competition from the ever more sophisticated and ubiquitous smart phone lenses, resulting in a huge array of options in the hand held camera on almost every level, designed to outpace the minicomputer in every smartphone which now can transform the limitations of tiny phone lenses (ironically many of those made by Panasonic),into results which have already allowed even movie directors such as The Florida Project’s Sean Baker to shoot an entire film (his debut,
Tangerine in 2015) for theatrical release using an iPhone 5S.

Prizewinners on Thursday evening:

After the Press Preview of items vying for attention at the Show the highlight of the first evening is always the LUCIE Technical Awards. This year’s winners were:


BEST INSTANT CAMERA
*WINNER: Fujifilm instax SQUARE SQ10


BEST FIXED-LENS COMPACT CAMERA
*WINNER: Fujifilm X100F
BEST ACTION CAMERA
*WINNER: Olympus TOUGH TG-5

BEST SMALL FORMAT SYSTEM CAMERA
*WINNER: Panasonic Lumix GH5

BEST FULL FRAME SYSTEM CAMERA
*WINNER: Sony A9

BEST WIDE ANGLE ZOOM LENS
*WINNER: Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art

BEST MEDIUM RANGE ZOOM LENS
*WINNER: Tamron SP 24-70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD G2

BEST TELEPHOTO ZOOM LENS
*WINNER: Nikon AF-S 70-200mm f/2.8E FL ED VR

BEST SPECIAL PURPOSE LENS
*WINNER: Sigma 14mm F1.8 DG HSM Art

BEST MEDIUM FORMAT SYSTEM CAMERA
*WINNER: Fujifilm GFX 50S

BEST CAMERA DRONE
*WINNER: DJI Mavic Pro

BEST CAMERA BAG
*WINNER: Think Tank Photo Airport Advantage

BEST TRIPOD
*WINNER: 3 Legged Thing Equinox Leo Carbon Fibre Tripod System & AirHed Switch

BEST CONTINUOUS LIGHT SOURCE
*WINNER: ARRI SkyPanel S120-C

BEST SPEEDLIGHT
*WINNER: Metz Mecablitz M400

BEST PHOTO EDITING SOFTWARE
*WINNER: Capture One Pro 10.1

BEST SOFTWARE PLUGIN
*WINNER: Macphun Luminar

BEST BACKUP SOLUTION
*WINNER: LaCie 2big Dock Thunderbolt 3

BEST INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
*WINNER: Leica M10

Picks include

$7000 for soft effects at Leica

$7000 for soft effects at Leica

The black painted Thambar-M 90 mm f/2.2 lens for its M Cameras from Leica, reclaimed from 1935, which is all about soft focus and bokeh (out of focus effects), since the lens is undercorrected toward the outer edges of the frame, controlled by a stepless aparture ring. (Thanbo is Greek for blurred, it seems). Available in Leica stores in mid November for $6,990 including the hard leather case in the original style.

Another gem from Panasonic, but has the ZS70 menu been improved from the unpredictable ZS100?

Another gem from Panasonic, it’s $300 less, but has the ZS70 menu been improved from the unpredictable ZS100?

Distinguished advanced point and shoot from Panasonic: Available since May for about $400, the Lumix ZS70 is a new option for those that like the lowlight+zoom capabilities of the ZS60 and the ZS100, with much the same features as the ZS100 except with a 3x longer 24-720 mm x30 zoom, and thus rather less low light sensitivity (chip is four times smaller); but many will look closely before buying to see if the mysteries of the complex menu have been tidied up to permit speed and reliability of quick shots when options such as 4K or wi-fi suddenly get switched on by a misplaced thumb. Meanwhile, a tactile ring has been added around the four command circle on the rear, a new Light Composition mode saves a series of images and combines them with an emphasis given to brighter pixels, and the 3-inch touch display can be tilted upward.

The $229 PocketWizard flash transreceiver boasts an “infinite” intervalometer that lets you shoot endless frames at any interval you choose for as long as you have power in your camera, all on the 344 MHz frequency, which should mean less interference.

Canon’s new compact flagship, the $1299 PowerShot G1 X Mark III, will be the first in the line to feature a 24.3-megapixel APS-C-size CMOS sensor, with Dual Pixel CMOS AF, a 24-72mm, f/2.8-5.6 (35mm equivalent) lens and a 2.36-million dot OLED viewfinder. The ISO range of 100-25,600 and continuous shooting speeds up to 7 fps with AF tracking or 9 fps with AF fixed at the first frame comes with Wi-Fi, NFC and Bluetooth, and panoramic mode in November 2017 for $1,299.

Advice from the show’s PR maestro, Scott Heath: Designed for professionals in the photographic and imaging industries as well as enthusiasts, PhotoPlus Expo showcases the latest advances in photography, digital imaging and filmmaking. Held annually at the Javits Convention Center, attendees have the opportunity to explore an inspiring array of photography and imaging products and services – all from the industry’s leading manufacturers. The show also offers seminars and intimate Photo Walks and Master Classes taught by world-renowned experts that focus on cutting-edge innovations and techniques.

NEW YORK (July 6, 2017) — If you love taking photos or creating videos and want to learn how to improve your skills, the annual PhotoPlus International Conference + Expo at the Jacob Javits Center in New York from October 25-28 is a must-attend event. PhotoPlus is the largest photographic conference and Expo in North America where manufacturers showcase the latest technologies and renowned photographers and filmmakers share their secrets to success through dozens of educational seminars and photo walks. Early bird discounts on conference passes, seminars, and photo walks are available through July 11 by visiting photoplusexpo.com and free registration to the 3-day Expo is available through September 12.

“The PhotoPlus Conference and Expo provides extensive education and growth opportunities for professionals and enthusiasts alike ranging from lighting, portraiture, post-production, filmmaking, business classes, and so much more,” explains Mike Gangel, Show Director at PhotoPlus Expo. “Our vast schedule of photo walks, master classes, conference seminars, keynotes, and portfolio reviews, combined with our large Expo hall filled with hundreds of exhibitors demonstrating the latest imaging technologies, has created a wonderful playground for anyone who loves the visual arts.”

PhotoPlus Expo offers the widest selection of educational programming outside a formal university classroom. Presented by world class instructors, attendees will leave PhotoPlus with a new level of knowledge they can apply to their craft and their business.

Early Bird Discounts on World Class Education
Attendees of this year’s PhotoPlus Expo will have an opportunity to take advantage of special early bird pricing on several conference packages including discounts on Full Conference Passes, a 2-day Film package by Future Media Concepts (FMC), dozens of seminars and photo walks, three keynote presentations, and comprehensive programming for photography using Drones. Early registration ensures access to the widest selection of educational programming before sessions sell out, including more than 60 new classes.

This year, Master Classes will be included with any 4-day conference pass (Wednesday-Saturday), 3-day pass (Thursday-Saturday) or 1-day passes (choice of any day, Wednesday-Saturday).

PHOTO+ Members
Members of PHOTO+ (PhotoServe.com and WPPI) will save 30% on all conference seminar pass options including a Full Conference Pass, One Day Conference Pass, individual seminars as well as Master Class, Photo Walk, and Drone+ purchases. Attendees can choose to become PHOTO+ members ($150.00) before or during the registration process to access exclusive discounts on conference passes, year-round vendor and product discounts, free subscriptions to PDN and Rangefinder magazines, discounts on contest entries throughout the year, and much more.

The price of a Full Conference Pass is $549.00 and a One Day Conference Pass is $299.00 for non-members. PHOTO+ members will save over $300 off the onsite price of the 4-Day pass and over $200 off the onsite price of the 1-Day pass when they register by July 11.

VIP Status
If you are looking to completely immerse yourself in PhotoPlus Expo, register as a VIP attendee and receive exclusive access, discounts, and opportunities for the entire duration of the event. With a VIP Expo badge, attendees will receive:
· Three-day admission to PhotoPlus Expo with instant badge pick-up at the VIP Customer Service Desk
· Admission and priority seating for keynote presentations on Thursday, Friday and Saturday
· The Official PPE VIP Bag packed with special promotions from a variety of exhibitors. More than 100 bags will include a Golden Ticket that can be redeemed for a special prize valued up to $250, including photo gear, gift cards and more! Prize sponsors include B&H Photo and others. VIP status is extremely limited.

The Expo
More than 200 exhibitors and brands of imaging hardware, software, and accessories will be on hand to demonstrate the latest technology in the world of photography and filmmaking, conduct free educational presentations at their booth, and offer special discounts on products and services throughout the Expo.

Additional learning opportunities can be found inside the Adobe Theater, which will be conveniently located on the show floor. Renowned photographers, filmmakers, and educators will conduct 30-minute seminars during the entire Expo to provide attendees with additional tips and tricks for improving their craft, and their business.

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Oct 18 Wed-20 Fri AES New York 2017 143rd International Convention

Where ideals link ears
Magnificent meet of minds interested in the quality of reproduced music and other sound in the service of which they resist the corruption induced by the Moore’s Law miniaturisation of user equipment such as smart phones and earphones only by dint of the most marvelous technical advances both hardware and software, where the major players are the studio engineers who grab this annual festivity as a chance to network in every corner of Javits exchanging views on the ever abundant tools of their trade, one of the most important being the earphones they use themselves in the studio to detect the slightest deviation from their mixing ideal,
and one of the most remarkable facets of the show this year is the continuing success of the Extreme Isolation range of phones from the small but much appreciated company Direct Sound, which rather interestingly achieves much of its freedom from interference in the matter at hand by using mechanics rather than software to muffle outside sounds with very substantial ear lining and strong build rather than clever software tricks, rendering isolation so effectively without discomfort in prolonged wearing that the editor of the chief magazine in the field says that he takes them on every plane flight as his best way of saying to his seatmates that he doesn’t feel like chatting about the latest Oval Office outrage, and we completely agree, while stating that the only reason we recommend Audio Technica phones over and above them is that the latter have that most mysterious X factor which allows the sound of a quartet of wood instruments or a full orchestra to expand in some subtle way that suggests the air between them as well as the air resonating through their playing, but we recognize that when it comes to sound engineering in a studio the strictly horizontal response effected by the Direct Sound approach may suit the professional at work better than the audiophile music lover who will swear that he cannot do without the liberating AT X-factor when listening to music at home with feet up, a position justified by the fact that Audio Technica makes some very fine studio models of its own, with the open back design of one of them possibly the best possible compromise in combining the ideals of both at once!

Find the highest audio quality behind the pr and the marketing curtain

Find the highest audio quality behind the pr and the marketing curtain

Maximum Audio AES NEW YORK 2017
143rd International Convention
Exhibits: October 18-20 / Program: October 18-21

SOUND AND STORY, AMPLIFIED

Do your interests or work include Broadcast and Streaming, Networked Audio, Audio for Virtual and Augmented Reality, Live Sound, Studio Recording, Home Recording, Music Production, Game Audio, Sound for Picture or Product Development? The 143rd Audio Engineering Society International Convention has you covered in one exclusively end-user focused event.

All Access registration provides access to the entire Convention, including a comprehensive papers, workshops and tutorials program. Exhibits-Plus access gains you entry to the exhibition floor and demo rooms, where leading manufacturers reveal and demonstrate the latest in audio hardware and software tools. The “Plus” includes the application-oriented sessions on the exhibit floor Expo theatres and Pavilions, along with other special events.

NAB Media in Action
AES New York 2017 will be co-located with the independent NAB Show New York 2017 event. In an adjacent exhibition hall, NAB Show New York exhibitors will be on hand with the latest video and distribution hardware and related sessions. Your Exhibits-Plus or All Access AES New York registration includes access to both exhibition halls.

Program and more
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Oct 14-15 Sat-Sun 12:00 – 6:00 pm William Engel 526 West 26St and others at Chelsea High Line Open Studios Weekend

Next weekend is the HIGH LINE OPEN STUDIOS, October 14-15, 2017, and supreme color painter William Engel will be participating at his studio #612 in 526 West 26 St.

Master of color

Master of color

New York School of Interior Design teacher Engel’s work in acrylic on canvas features almost mesmerizing subtleties of colors mixed from his own carefully nurtured source in Paris, as seen at his 2016 opening at the Chelsea Skoto Gallery in December, at the William Hotel in midtown, which has based its interior design on seven commissioned Engel paintings, and most recently in painting the doors of the Lutheran Grace and St Pauls Church at West 71 Street between Columbus and Broadway a resplendent red more deeply yet sensitively resonant to the eye and heart than any camera can capture.

William Engel hard at work Sat painting the Lutheran Church door a red both earthly and celestial

William Engel hard at work Sat painting the Lutheran Church door a red both earthly and celestial

Colorist extraordinaire William Engels

Colorist extraordinaire William Engels

“I have been pouring oil paint for more than 25 years. Sometimes the pours are about landscapes of my mind and involve a process of up to 20 poured colors at once and built up layer upon layer over three months. I have been also exploring the idea of more modern works with only one singular pour per week and layered in spatial configurations that conclude in a design of asymmetric balance. The singular pours of buttery oils are also layered over the course of three months for each work. More recently, I am working with french acrylic paint that allows more transparency for each layer. I am inspired by the work of Helen Frankenthaler, Frank Gehry, and Richard Diebenkorn and continue to layer and pour paint using gravity as my brush.” —William Engel.

He is a long-time faculty member of the New York School of Interior Design. As a design educator, he recently developed a new course, Advanced Color, that is implemented within the MFA and BFA programs at the college. His first book, Portfolio Design for Interiors, coauthored with Harold Linton from George Mason University, is scheduled to come out in spring of 2017 with Bloomsbury London/Fairchild New York.

West Chelsea artists living and working in the West Chelsea Gallery district are opening their studios to public for the annual fall art season artists’ open studios. The event is free and open to the public.

Supreme color painter William Engel’s studio #612 at 526 West 26 St is usually by appointment 212 920 6477 bengel55@yahoo.com williamengel.net Facebook Bill Engel Twitter @williamengelnyc

Highline Open Studios is the event where talents can be discovered and artwork can be purchased directly from the artists, at studio prices, without a gallery markup, which can be 50% or more.

Artists Open Studios, Saturday and Sunday, October 14-15,
2017 from 12:00 – 6:00 p.m.
More than 45 West Chelsea artists open their studios to the
public during the weekend of October 14-15, 2017. The free
self-guided open studios tour stretches along the High Line
between Westbeth Artists building and West Chelsea Arts
building. The self-guided tour starts at the West Chelsea Arts building, 508-526 West 26th Street where visitors can pickup Tour Maps and artists information.

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Oct 14 Sat 2:30pm Helix Center “Fake” Knowledge: Knowing and the Illusion of Knowing

“Fake” Knowledge: Knowing and the Illusion of Knowing
Saturday, October 14th, 2017 at 2:30pm

A nomenclator was a slave whose duty was to accompanying his master in canvassing the streets of Classical Rome in order to recall the names of those his master encountered. Each of us is, in a way, both that ancient politician and that slave, relying on others’ memories to supply us with knowledge, and others relying on us for the knowledge we recall for them. Hence, knowledge has always been, in part, a distributive entity, requiring a delegation of mental tasks, an implicit commitment to a social contract.

Histories have documented the occurrence of mass delusions—which also leads us to question our collective intuition. Close to the origins of humankind is a fascination with the unknown and the unverifiable, with the early cultivation of spiritual life and religion proving as a testament to this. What is apocryphal and what should believe in? Even to the present day, as technology and science become evermore complicated, we are asked to distinguish between proven fact and educated speculation.

In the age of a seemingly omniscient internet, an impersonal cloud-mind (with which—despite attempts to humanize Siri and “her” ilk—no one can yet lay claim outside of fiction to a convincing reciprocal emotional relationship), when the object of our confided ignorance is no longer a person but a thing, when our subjective sense of self is no longer limned by the encounter with another, what happens to our ability to distinguish internal from external knowledge? Are we led to an illusory sense of our own knowledge?

Is the immediate, distributive information of the internet changing the way our brains work, possibly holding the promise of transcending the limitations of individual knowledge? If so, does the virtue of its collective knowledge lead us further to question the very value of our individuality? Or are we heedlessly (or ineluctably) heading toward a human-machine collective heretofore only within the purview of science fiction?

There is great excitement in the scientific community about the prospect of forming a transitive partnership with a seemingly unlimited source of knowledge. Where, however, is the place of wisdom? Does more information, more knowledge, inevitably lead to superior opinions, decision-making, and moral understanding? Is collective knowledge always less susceptible to the pretense of knowledge that individual thinking is? The history of human advancement would suggest otherwise, replete as it is with counterexamples to the superiority of collective knowledge over individual reasoning

Participants:
Paul Boghossian
Silver Professor of Philosophy, NYU
Paul Artin Boghossian is Silver Professor of Philosophy at New York University and director of its New York Institute of Philosophy. Elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he has published many papers in the philosophy of mind and epistemology, on such topics as color, rule-following, eliminativism, naturalism, self-knowledge, a priori knowledge, analytic… read more »

Professor Kahneman, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University. 05/10/04

Daniel Kahneman
Professor Emeritus, Princeton University
Daniel Kahneman is Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Public Affairs at Princeton., He is best known for his joint research with Amos Tversky on human judgment and decision making. Tversky did in 1996. Kahneman was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2002 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013. He is the author… read more »

Eric Kandel
University Professor, Columbia University
Eric R. Kandel, M.D., is University Professor at Columbia; Kavli Professor and Director, Kavli Institute for Brain Science; Co-Director, Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute; and an Investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. A graduate of Harvard College and N.Y.U. School of Medicine, Kandel trained in Neurobiology at the NIH and in Psychiatry… read more »

Mark Mitton
Magician
Mark Mitton is a magician who is fascinated by using magic to better understand how we see the world. He performs magic and produces unique entertainment around the world, and explores the limits and potential of perception. Mark’s specialty is physical misdirection, or what some call “embodied cognition”. He regularly presents on ‘Perception & Deception’… read more »

Daphna Shohamy
Associate Professor of Psychology, Columbia University
Steven Sloman
Professor of Cognitive, Linguistic and Psychological Sciences, Brown University
Steven Sloman is a Professor of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences at Brown University where he has worked since 1992. He did his PhD in Psychology at Stanford University from 1986-1990 and then did post-doctoral research for two years at the University of Michigan. He is currently Editor-in-Chief of the journal Cognition. Steven is a… read more »

One comment on ““Fake” Knowledge: Knowing and the Illusion of Knowing”

Brett F Whysel says: September 21, 2017 at 11:31 am
I just heard Prof. Sloman speak at BSPA in the Knowledge Illusion…profoundly thought provoking. I’m really looking forward to this.
My summary of the day will appear soon at http://www.decisionfish.com

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Oct 10 Tue 6pm-8.30pm Overseas Press Club Panel on Afghanistan Includes Journalist Jere Van Dyk Author of The Trade: My Journey into the Labyrinth of Political Kidnapping

Journalist and author Jere Van Dyk was kidnapped in Afghanistan in 2008, and could never shake the questions around his capture and subsequent release. In his new book, The Trade: My Journey into the Labyrinth of Political Kidnapping, Van Dyk recounts his 2014 return to the country to investigate his kidnapping. He travels across Afghanistan, looking into how secret deals are brokered among governments, criminal outfits, families and corporations.

Van Dyk appeared on the Leonard Lopate NPR show on WNYC Mon Oct 7 an episode which Lopate said he had found moving after Van Dyk in a choking voice recounted how obligated he felt to memorializing his fellow captives who lost their lives.
https://lnkd.in/espdAFC.

Jere Van Dyk will appear as part of a panel discussion called “Afghanistan: America’s Longest War” at the Overseas Press Club of America (40 W 45th St., between 5th and 6th Ave.) on Oct. 10 at 6 p.m.


Jere Van Dyk is a journalist and author. He is currently a consultant on Afghanistan, Pakistan, and al-Qaeda for CBS News. In 2008, Van Dyk was captured and imprisoned by the Taliban in the no-man’s-land between Afghanistan and Pakistan. He tells the story of his 45-day ordeal in
his book, Captive (2010). His new book, “THE TRADE: My Journey into the Labyrinth of Political Kidnapping,” is being released the day of the event and will be available for purchase.
In 1981, while working as a correspondent for The New York Times, Van Dyk lived with the Afghan mujahideen as they battled the Soviet Army. His articles in The New York Times, which included a three-part story in the paper’s Sunday magazine, were nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. He later wrote In Afghanistan, a book on his experiences during that journey. In 2001, Mr. Van Dyk, working as a free-lance correspondent, covered the war in Afghanistan and the murder of Daniel Pearl.
Van Dyk has written for many publications, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and National Geographic. He has traveled in Afghanistan and other countries in the
region since the 1970s and reported on them for CBS News (both radio and television), CNN, National Public Radio, and other broadcast organizations. Jere also served as a consultant on the film, Charlie Wilson’s War.

Afghanistan: America’s Longest War
On Oct. 10, the OPC is hosting a panel to discuss the challenges of establishing stability and democracy in Afghanistan. All are welcome. If you cover or have covered Afghanistan, please consider this event an informal reunion and forward this invitation to your colleagues and friends.this invitation to your colleagues and friends.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017 from 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM EDT

Club Quarters, 40 West 45th Street, New York
40 West 45th Street
Club Quarters
New York, NY 10036

Afghanistan: America’s Longest War
The Pentagon is once again pouring American troops into Afghanistan to prevent the Taliban from consolidating power. But the Americans have yet to fathom the murky and ever-shifting alliances among the Taliban, the Haqqani network, Al Qaeda and other non-state players. The challenge of establishing stability in Afghanistan, much less democracy, is further compounded by intervention from Pakistan and India, and more recently from Iran and Russia. What is the way forward?

All are welcome. But if you cover or have covered Afghanistan, please consider this event an informal reunion and forward this invitation to your colleagues and friends.

Panelists:

Kathy Gannon is senior correspondent for Pakistan and Afghanistan for The Associated Press and is based in Islamabad, Pakistan. She has covered the region since 1987 and was the only western journalist in Taliban- ruled Afghanistan during the U.S.-led invasion that followed the 9/11 attacks. She was attacked and wounded while covering an election in Afghanistan in 2014.

David Rohde is the online news director for The New Yorker, a two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize and a former reporter at Reuters and The New York Times. He was kidnapped by the Taliban in 2008, escaping after 7 months. He is the author, with Kristen Mulvihill, of “A Rope and a Prayer: A Kidnapping from Two Sides.”

Jere Van Dyk covered the Afghan- Soviet war for The New York Times in the early 1980s, living with what is today called the Haqqani network. In 2008 he was kidnapped and held for ransom for 45 days. His book, ”Captive,” describes that ordeal. His new book, “THE TRADE: My Journey into the Labyrinth of Political Kidnapping,” is being released the day of the event and will be available for purchase.

Moderator: Willam J. Holstein covered the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in late 1979 and was one of the American journalists placed under house arrest and deported for “interfering in the internal affairs of a sovereign nation.” He has authored seven books and is president of the OPC Foundation.

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Oct 2 Mon 10-12pm Met:Master Drawings by Leonardo, Dürer, Rembrandt, Goya, Ingres, Seurat, and Matisse (till January 7, 2018)

Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres (French, 1780-1867). Study for Raphael and the Fornarina (detail), ca. 1814. Graphite on white wove paper, 10 x 7 3/4 in. (25.4 x 19.7 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975 (1975.1.646)

Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres (French, 1780-1867). Study for Raphael and the Fornarina (detail), ca. 1814. Graphite on white wove paper, 10 x 7 3/4 in. (25.4 x 19.7 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Robert Lehman Collection, 1975 (1975.1.646)

A rare, brief chance to see a historic selection of great artists’ drawings over the last seven centuries, the first time that such a historically representative selection has been made from the 750 sheets given the Met by the great collector Robert Lehman, which are usually hidden away to save them from the light which will eventually damage them, but now are granted this exceptionally roomy basement rotunda gallery until mid January, allowing those who seek some of the finest examples of lively natural portraiture in the world to see some among these 59 examples for themselves, including self portraits of magical quality such as the young Dürer’s, when he was 23.

Master Drawings by Leonardo, Dürer, Rembrandt, Goya, Ingres, Seurat, and Matisse Featured in New Exhibition at The Met

The first presentation to highlight the full range of Robert Lehman’s vast and distinguished drawings collection—numbering more than 700 sheets—and to explore his significant activity as a 20th-century collector, this exhibition features 60 masterpieces of European drawing spanning the Renaissance to the Modern age. Leonardo to Matisse: Masterpieces from the Robert Lehman Collection also traces the development of European drawing across five centuries through works by Leonardo da Vinci, Dürer, Rembrandt, Goya, Ingres, Seurat, and Matisse, and presents a dynamic array of styles, techniques, and genres. The selection also illustrates the different facets of the artists’ creative processes—from Leonardo’s keen anatomical observation in his Study of a Bear Walking, to Dürer’s awakening artistic self-consciousness in his Self-Portrait study, to Rembrandt’s re-interpretation of Leonardo’s painted masterpiece, The Last Supper.

The Robert Lehman Collection is one of the most distinguished privately assembled art collections in the United States. His bequest to The Met, a collection of extraordinary quality and breadth acquired over the course of 60 years, spans 700 years of western European art, from the 14th to the 20th century. The 2,600 works in the collection include paintings, drawings, manuscript illumination, sculpture, glass, textiles, antique frames, maiolica, enamels, and precious jeweled objects.

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