Oct 10 Tue 6pm-8.30pm Overseas Press Club Panel on Afghanistan Includes Journalist Jere Van Dyk Author of The Trade: My Journey into the Labyrinth of Political Kidnapping

Journalist and author Jere Van Dyk was kidnapped in Afghanistan in 2008, and could never shake the questions around his capture and subsequent release. In his new book, The Trade: My Journey into the Labyrinth of Political Kidnapping, Van Dyk recounts his 2014 return to the country to investigate his kidnapping. He travels across Afghanistan, looking into how secret deals are brokered among governments, criminal outfits, families and corporations.

Van Dyk appeared on the Leonard Lopate NPR show on WNYC Mon Oct 7 an episode which Lopate said he had found moving after Van Dyk in a choking voice recounted how obligated he felt to memorializing his fellow captives who lost their lives.
https://lnkd.in/espdAFC.

Jere Van Dyk will appear as part of a panel discussion called “Afghanistan: America’s Longest War” at the Overseas Press Club of America (40 W 45th St., between 5th and 6th Ave.) on Oct. 10 at 6 p.m.


Jere Van Dyk is a journalist and author. He is currently a consultant on Afghanistan, Pakistan, and al-Qaeda for CBS News. In 2008, Van Dyk was captured and imprisoned by the Taliban in the no-man’s-land between Afghanistan and Pakistan. He tells the story of his 45-day ordeal in
his book, Captive (2010). His new book, “THE TRADE: My Journey into the Labyrinth of Political Kidnapping,” is being released the day of the event and will be available for purchase.
In 1981, while working as a correspondent for The New York Times, Van Dyk lived with the Afghan mujahideen as they battled the Soviet Army. His articles in The New York Times, which included a three-part story in the paper’s Sunday magazine, were nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. He later wrote In Afghanistan, a book on his experiences during that journey. In 2001, Mr. Van Dyk, working as a free-lance correspondent, covered the war in Afghanistan and the murder of Daniel Pearl.
Van Dyk has written for many publications, including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and National Geographic. He has traveled in Afghanistan and other countries in the
region since the 1970s and reported on them for CBS News (both radio and television), CNN, National Public Radio, and other broadcast organizations. Jere also served as a consultant on the film, Charlie Wilson’s War.

Afghanistan: America’s Longest War
On Oct. 10, the OPC is hosting a panel to discuss the challenges of establishing stability and democracy in Afghanistan. All are welcome. If you cover or have covered Afghanistan, please consider this event an informal reunion and forward this invitation to your colleagues and friends.this invitation to your colleagues and friends.

Tuesday, October 10, 2017 from 6:00 PM to 7:30 PM EDT

Club Quarters, 40 West 45th Street, New York
40 West 45th Street
Club Quarters
New York, NY 10036

Afghanistan: America’s Longest War
The Pentagon is once again pouring American troops into Afghanistan to prevent the Taliban from consolidating power. But the Americans have yet to fathom the murky and ever-shifting alliances among the Taliban, the Haqqani network, Al Qaeda and other non-state players. The challenge of establishing stability in Afghanistan, much less democracy, is further compounded by intervention from Pakistan and India, and more recently from Iran and Russia. What is the way forward?

All are welcome. But if you cover or have covered Afghanistan, please consider this event an informal reunion and forward this invitation to your colleagues and friends.

Panelists:

Kathy Gannon is senior correspondent for Pakistan and Afghanistan for The Associated Press and is based in Islamabad, Pakistan. She has covered the region since 1987 and was the only western journalist in Taliban- ruled Afghanistan during the U.S.-led invasion that followed the 9/11 attacks. She was attacked and wounded while covering an election in Afghanistan in 2014.

David Rohde is the online news director for The New Yorker, a two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize and a former reporter at Reuters and The New York Times. He was kidnapped by the Taliban in 2008, escaping after 7 months. He is the author, with Kristen Mulvihill, of “A Rope and a Prayer: A Kidnapping from Two Sides.”

Jere Van Dyk covered the Afghan- Soviet war for The New York Times in the early 1980s, living with what is today called the Haqqani network. In 2008 he was kidnapped and held for ransom for 45 days. His book, ”Captive,” describes that ordeal. His new book, “THE TRADE: My Journey into the Labyrinth of Political Kidnapping,” is being released the day of the event and will be available for purchase.

Moderator: Willam J. Holstein covered the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in late 1979 and was one of the American journalists placed under house arrest and deported for “interfering in the internal affairs of a sovereign nation.” He has authored seven books and is president of the OPC Foundation.

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