Mar 20 Mon Met Breuer (Whitney) Floor 4: Marsden Hartley’s Maine and Lygia Pape: A Multitude of Forms

Marsden Hartley (American, 1877–1943). Canuck Yankee Lumberjack at Old Orchard Beach, Maine (detail), 1940–41. Oil on Masonite-type hardboard. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Gift of Joseph H. Hirshhorn, 1966. Photo by Cathy Carver

MARSDEN HARTLEY’S MAINE
Exhibition Dates: March 15–June 18, 2017
Exhibition Location: The Met Breuer, Floor 3

The exhibition Marsden Hartley’s Maine, on view at The Met Breuer from March 15 through June 18, 2017, will showcase the American artist’s lifelong artistic engagement with his home state of Maine. Approximately 90 paintings and drawings will illuminate his extraordinarily expressive range—from Post-Impressionist interpretations of seasonal change in inland Maine in the early 1900s to folk-inspired depictions, beginning in the late 1930s, of the state’s hearty inhabitants, majestic coastline, and great geological icon, Mount Katahdin.

Marsden Hartley’s Maine is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Colby College Museum of Art. Following its presentation at The Met, the exhibition will be on view at the Colby College Museum, in Waterville, Maine, from July 8 through November 12, 2017.

The exhibition is made possible by the Barrie A. and Deedee Wigmore Foundation, the Henry Luce Foundation, the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, and the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund.

It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Colby College Museum of Art.

Born in Lewiston, Maine, in 1877, Hartley became known for his peripatetic nature, especially his time spent in Paris and Berlin, where he participated in the European avant-garde. Over the course of his career, however, he returned to his home state repeatedly, painted Maine subjects while living abroad, and proclaimed himself the “painter from Maine” in the final chapter of his life. With the artist’s place of origin as its focus, the exhibition will trace the powerful threads of continuity that run through Hartley’s work and underlie many of his greatest contributions to American modernism. To Hartley, Maine was a springboard to imagination and creative inspiration, a locus of memory and longing, a refuge, and a place for communion with previous artists who painted there, especially Winslow Homer, the most famous American artist associated with the state. Hartley died in Ellsworth, Maine, in 1943.

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Lygia Pape (Brazilian, 1927–2004). Divisor (Divider), 1968. Performance at Museu de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro, 1990. Photo by Paula Pape. © Projeto Lygia Pape

Lygia Pape: A Multitude of Forms

Exhibition Dates: March 21–July 23, 2017
Exhibition Location: The Met Breuer, Floor 4
Press Preview: Monday, March 20, 10 am–noon

The first major retrospective exhibition in the United States devoted to Brazilian artist Lygia Pape (1927–2004) will open at The Met Breuer on Tuesday, March 21. A critical figure in the development of Brazilian modern art, Pape combined geometric abstraction with notions of body, time, and space in unique ways aiming to integrate the art object with life experience. Covering a prolific, unclassifiable career that spanned five decades, the exhibition will examine Pape’s extraordinarily rich oeuvre as manifest across varied media, from sculpture, prints, and painting to installation, performance, and film.

Alongside Lygia Clark and Hélio Oiticica, Lygia Pape is one of the most prominent artists of her generation and was a leading protagonist at a crucial moment for the history of art in Brazil. During a period of intense industrialization following World War II, concrete and constructivist European trends entered the country where figuration had been the dominant vocabulary. Pape was part of the Concrete movement (Grupo Frente) in Rio de Janeiro, reworking the legacies of geometric abstraction. It then evolved in 1959 into the Neoconcrete group, aimed at giving priority to experimentation and process over any normative principle. She was among the first to consider integrating the space of the artwork with the space of the viewer with works that demand participation or interaction, marking a breakthrough moment in 20th-century art.

The exhibition is made possible by The Daniel and Estrellita Brodsky Foundation and The Garcia Family Foundation.

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