Oct 24 Mon 10am-Noon The Met Breuer Shows Kerry James Marshall: Mastry

Kerry James Marshall (American, b. 1955). Untitled (Studio), 2014. Acrylic on PVC panels. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, The Jacques and Natasha Gelman Foundation Gift, Acquisitions Fund and The Metropolitan Museum of Art Multicultural Audience Development Initiative Gift, 2015 (2015.366) © Kerry James Marshall

Black and powerful
A powerful humanism comes back onto the current art scene with a vengeance in this stunning retrospective exhibit at the Whitney building which is now the Breuer of the Met – a colorful and hugely vibrant Niagara of big canvases and even lighted graphic box displays in a show with more power and emotional reality to it than the comparatively anemic Whitney ever did before with its more intellectually oriented generated choices.

Update: The Met Breuer Extends Hours for Final Day of Critically Acclaimed Exhibition Kerry James Marshall: Mastry

For the final day of the popular exhibition Kerry James Marshall: Mastry, The Met Breuer will have extended hours on Sunday, January 29, staying open until 9 p.m. (The Museum normally closes at 5:30 p.m. on Sunday evenings and is regularly open until 9 p.m. only on Fridays and Saturdays.)

This retrospective of paintings by Kerry James Marshall (b. 1955, Birmingham, Alabama) marks the artist’s largest museum exhibition to date and spans the artist’s remarkable 35-year career, revealing the complex and compelling creative output of one of today’s most important living artists. Marshall is a history painter whose work reflects and challenges the time and culture he inhabits. Driven by an examination of the historical dearth and relatively recent appearance of the black figure in Western painting, he is immersed in the past and present of painting—particularly the century-long conflict between figuration and abstraction. He is also committed to a vision of American history that represents the narratives—triumphs and failures both—of individual African Americans as well as the concept of blackness as a whole. In the grand scale of the Old Masters, Marshall creates works that engage with themes of visibility and invisibility, portraiture and self-portraiture, religious iconography, the politics of Pan-Africanism and black militancy, and the ethics of painting.

Special events inspired by the exhibition will take place at The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Breuer, including the all-day symposium Kerry James Marshall—A Creative Convening, on Saturday, January 28, in the Grace Rainey Rogers Auditorium.

Marking the artist’s largest museum exhibition to date, Kerry James Marshall: Mastry, a retrospective of paintings by Kerry James Marshall will span the artist’s remarkable 35-year career, to reveal the complex and compelling creative output of one of today’s most important living artists. Marshall (b. 1955, Birmingham, Alabama) is a history painter whose work reflects and challenges the time and culture he inhabits. Driven by an examination of the historical dearth and relatively recent appearance of the black figure in Western painting, he is immersed in the past and present of painting—particularly the century-long conflict between figuration and abstraction. He is also committed to a vision of American history that represents the narratives—triumphs and failures both—of individual African Americans as well as the concept of blackness as a whole. In the grand scale of the Old Masters, Marshall creates works that engage with themes of visibility and invisibility, portraiture and self-portraiture, religious iconography, the politics of Pan-Africanism and black militancy, and the ethics of painting.

The exhibition is accompanied by the complementary installation, Kerry James Marshall Selects—a selection of approximately 40 objects chosen by the artist from The Met collection.
When: Monday, October 24, 10 a.m.–noon.

Remarks at 11 a.m. The artist will be present.
Where: The Met Breuer, 3rd and 4th floors
945 Madison Avenue, at 75th Street
Contact: For interview requests, please contact Alexandra Kozlakowski at 212–570–3951 or communications@metmuseum.org.

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