Sep 19 Mon 10am – 12pm Met Jerusalem 1000-1400 Every People Under The Sun

Choir Books of the Franciscans of Bethlehem Tempera, gold, and ink on parchment Andrea di Bartolo (active in Siena and Venice, 1380–1429) and workshop Ca. 1401–4, Venice Terra Sancta Museum, Bibliotheca Custodialis, Jerusalem In presenting these massive and colorful books to the Franciscan community in Bethlehem, Henry IV of England (1367–1413) asked that they pray for the soul of his father. The friars’ daily routine followed a rhythm of communal prayer and singing, reflected in these volumes. The Prophet Isaiah, in a Letter H The prophet Isaiah stands outside the walls of Jerusalem, as the hymn proclaims: “Jerusalem, thy salvation cometh quickly; why art thou wasted with sorrow? . . . Fear not, for I will save thee

Choir Books of the Franciscans of Bethlehem Tempera, gold, and ink on parchment Andrea di Bartolo (active in Siena and Venice, 1380–1429) and workshop Ca. 1401–4, Venice Terra Sancta Museum, Bibliotheca Custodialis, Jerusalem In presenting these massive and colorful books to the Franciscan community in Bethlehem, Henry IV of England (1367–1413) asked that they pray for the soul of his father. The friars’ daily routine followed a rhythm of communal prayer and singing, reflected in these volumes. The Prophet Isaiah, in a Letter H The prophet Isaiah stands outside the walls of Jerusalem, as the hymn proclaims: “Jerusalem, thy salvation cometh quickly; why art thou wasted with sorrow? . . . Fear not, for I will save thee

Knight on Horseback, copper alloy, mid 13th Century from Lower Saxony, actually a vessel for washing hands (water is poured through the helmet and spills from the horse’s forelock) is included in an exhibition of the treasures of art and craft from Jerusalem during its heyday as a global religious center

Another item from the Met’s own collection, this chasse (box for relics shaped like a church) depicts Christ’s Crucifixion and Second Coming in copper and enamel (about 1180-90 from Limoges)


Religious treasure
Nearly fifty rich works of art and craft from medieval Jerusalem, the worldly focus of religion for Christians, Jews and Muslims over 1000-1400, have been borrowed from the city’s present religious communities to share the spotlight at the Met with 200 works in total that include tomb statuary, remarkable huge choir books from the Franciscans with the four line staff of the time (above), ornate boxes for relics, very fine large lamps, goblets, bracelets, wedding rings, maps, bottles, crosses, mats, pillar capitals, bibles and Qu’rans all mellowed in the glow of deep religiosity, in a unique survey where the sole vast gap is an imaginative one, the legendary Temple of the Mount destroyed by the Romans in AD70 which was never rebuilt but which lives on vividly in the memory of Jews today, and where the attached exhibition shop allows visitors to buy their own reminders of how religion inspires unmatchable art and artifacts, including carpets and colored glasses, and guides to all three religions which competed over Jerusalem then and since.

attendnyc-sep-12-mon-met-jerusalem

September 26, 2016–January 8, 2017

Exhibition Location:
The Tisch Galleries, Gallery 899
Press Preview:
Monday, September 19, 10:00 am–noon

Beginning around the year 1000, Jerusalem attained unprecedented significance as a location, destination, and symbol to people of diverse faiths from Iceland to India. Multiple competitive and complementary religious traditions, fueled by an almost universal preoccupation with the city, gave rise to one of the most creative periods in its history.

Jerusalem has been chosen and sanctified by God, trodden by His feet, honored by angels and frequented by every people under heaven.” Jacques de Vitry (ca. 1160/70–1240), bishop of Acre in the Holy Land

A kind of Jerusalem fever gripped much of the world from about 1000 to 1400. Across three continents, thousands made their way to the Holy City—from Jewish, Christian, and Islamic traditions alike. Generals and their armies fought over it. Merchants profited from it. Patrons, artists, pilgrims, poets, and scholars drew inspiration from it. Focusing their attention on this singular spot, they praised its magic, endowed its sacred buildings, and created luxury goods for residents and visitors. As a result, the Holy City shaped the art of this period in significant ways.

Opening at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on September 26, the landmark exhibition Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven will demonstrate the key role that the Holy City, sacred to the three Abrahamic faiths, played in shaping the art of this period. In these centuries, Jerusalem was home to more cultures, religions, and languages than ever before. Through times of peace as well as war, Jerusalem remained a constant source of inspiration that resulted in art of great beauty and fascinating complexity.

More (incl complete list of exhibits with captions)
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