Dec 11 Mon 3.30-5.30pm Met Shows The Silver Caesars, Mystery Dish Stand Statuettes from the 1500s (Dec 12 Tue-Mar 11 Sun)

The height of the goldsmith’s art in the 1500s, this figure is of Vespasian, one of the twelve Caesars mounted on a pictorial horizontal dish in the magnificent set of 12 mysterious Aldobrandini Tazze at the Met

The Silver Caesars: A Renaissance Mystery

Extraordinary work by Rennaissance silversmiths in the 1500s, twelve tall dish stands featuring the first twelve Caesars – but who did them, and why?
Some have feet attached by a 19th Century dealer (Can you tell which?)

Rich life portrayals by Rennaissance goldsmiths
White (ungilded ) silver might seem emotionally cold in the imagination but not in this unique collection, for there is something inherent in the match of gilded silver and the art of working it into sculpture and images on a surface in this extraordinary array of small foot high Caesars on top of wide dish pedestals that transcends its very high craft quality, and the brilliant display produced by curator Julia Siemon, that addresses the viewer heart to heart, a warmth that pervades the craftsmanship that speaks of its roots in the lost sixteenth century workshop where it was produced – the source is a great mystery but Siemon says that the Netherlands or Flanders is the likely region, since the sheer erudition involved and the busy-ness or
horror vacui with which their surfaces are filled is unlikely to be Italian or German – at a time when such work was still human to human, bench to home, as it were, though in this case for a very noble or royal client, but still visibly a craft which while superb technically addresses the viewer as directly as a child’s history book, with a similar focus on people, in this case the first twelve Caesars, twelve Roman emperors in their costumes, whose small figures pose on short stands in the center of wide dish cups whose surface is worked with special skill to portray scenes from their imperial lives, though notably choosing only positive scenes reflecting their assumed glory, where Vespassian for example, who ruled from AD 69-79, is shown as he spits in the eye of a blind man, and touches a lame man’s leg with his heel (two acts which miraculously cured the two supplicants of their ailments), or seated at breakfast when a stray dog brings in a human hand and drops it under the table, a good omen of future power, or in triumphal procession after his military victory over the Jews in AD 68.

Hi-res photos of individual scenes from the dishes are projected overhead to clarify the images, in this case the rooster that settled on Vitellius' shoulder and then stood on his head while he judged at a tribunal in Vienna

Hi-res photos of individual scenes from the dishes are projected overhead to clarify the images, in this case the rooster that settled on Vitellius’ shoulder and then stood on his head while he judged at a tribunal in Vienna

all drawn on paper then pricked in outline on the silver plate before being embossed and lightly gilded in the sixteenth century manner, and now collected and displayed by the Met with for the first time the right dish matched with the right Emperor, after their components got mixed up over the centuries, with their stories explained by finding the references in Suetonius’s history of Rome that the craftsmen drew upon, a copy of which is displayed too, where just a few lines give rise to an image, some of the larger ones embellished with Renaissance houses and townscapes in the background, with enhanced digital displays of two tazze on an upper wall with narration by Classicist Mary Beard of Cambridge also placed on the Net’s website.

The foot tall figures of the Caesars – here, Augustus – are mounted on dishes into which are moulded scenes from their lives

(Met:) The superb technical virtuosity of Renaissance silversmiths is nowhere more evident than in the magnificent set of 12 silver-gilt standing cups from the 16th century known collectively as the Aldobrandini Tazze. Each of the Tazze stands over a foot tall and features a shallow footed dish surmounted by a figure of one of the first 12 Caesars. On the intricately wrought interior of each dish appear four episodes from the life of the corresponding ruler, as recounted by the Roman historian Suetonius. Although the Tazze are among the finest and rarest examples of 16th-century European silverwork, little is known about their creation. The questions of when, where, why, for whom, and by whom these splendid luxury objects were made will be addressed in the exhibition The Silver Caesars: A Renaissance Mystery, opening December 12 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The complete set has not been seen together since the mid-19th century, when it was disassembled and dispersed, its constituent parts misidentified and mismatched. In addition, the elements of all 12 Tazze will be displayed in their original configuration—a unique opportunity for modern viewers to appreciate one of the most enigmatic monuments of in the work of 16th-century goldsmiths.

The exhibition is made possible by The Schroder Foundation, Selim K. Zilkha, the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation, Nina von Maltzahn, and an anonymous donor.

The Silver Caesars will highlight the elegance and astonishing erudition of the Tazze, presenting them with a small selection of other works in silver and other media, including both ancient and Renaissance coins and medals and Renaissance prints, books, and paintings. The exhibition will consider such topics as 19th-century views of the Renaissance and Renaissance views of ancient Rome. Examples of 19th-century works that the Tazze inspired will be included. In addition to offering new insights into the Tazze and their history, the exhibition will explore the set’s famously mysterious reputation—engaging the visitor in tracing clues that may lead to a better understanding of this Renaissance masterpiece.

Within the exhibition, a digital component featuring high-resolution photography of two Tazze will enable visitors to explore these works and their fantastic antiquarian imagery in greater depth. This material, including narration by Mary Beard, Professor of Classics, University of Cambridge, will also be available on The Met website.

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Dec 6 Wed Daniel Ellsberg at Barnes and Noble 86 St on The Doomsday Machine, warning of human extinction

Daneil Ellsberg is predicting the end of the human race if the current nuclear plans are not changed at the top level he used to work in, so why is he smiling so blithely?

Barnes and Noble 86 St and Lexington Daniel Ellsberg Dec 6 Wed 7pm The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner. The Author of Secrets: A Memoir of Vietnam and the Pentagon Papers and the Pentagon Papers talks of the dangers of America’s Top Secret nuclear policy.

Having won the eternal gratitude of the American public for destroying their illusory trust in the federal government’s competence in prosecuting war in general with the Pentagon Papers revelation fifty years ago, Daniel Ellsberg is back with an even more damning and fearsome revelation, how Washington has been risking human annihilation for seventy years with insane plans for all out nuclear preemptive attack against Russia which were formulated by Strategic Air Command under Eisenhower and stunningly remain unchanged in seventy years, an ongoing threat of human extinction now escalated with the unpredictable current President hands on the button, all based on documents Ellsberg copied at the time of the Pentagon Papers over fifty years ago but buried and eventually lost in a garbage dump as he fought his initial battle as the world’s most public spirited official breakaway, but added to his inside experience at the top levels of command putting us closer to midnight on the clock of human extinction than ever before right now, and laid out with alarming brilliance in his new book from Bloomsbury, The Doomsday Machine, which is so disastrous in its implications for the very survival of the human race that many may wish the world champion whistleblower had prioritized over the Pentagon Papers, since it involves the fate of all humanity rather than simply the deaths of mere millions in the Vietnam war, and

Daniel Ellsberg is about to announce the possible extinction of the human race, but doesn’t seem too worried

last night the author bounced on stage in what seemed a remarkably cheerful mood last night to first execute a couple of magic tricks

The author of the Doomsday Machine can make handkerchiefs disappear and reappear, but not the Doomsday Machine at the Strategic Air Command

where he made two red and green handkerchiefs disappear and reappear and then explain straightaway why he hadn’t mentioned all this insanity before, when half a century ago he felt ethically impelled to risk prison by taking the lid off the idiocy, criminality and deceit of Vietnam policy, explaining that he had written out early chapters around 2000 and given it to the editor of his autobiography Secrets but it simply didn’t fit and needed its own book, which is certainly true, this impressively thorough and intelligently written book may be the most important release of the year if not the decade, since it recounts the stupidity of Eisenhower’s early nuclear strategy in which any major attack from Russia was to be met by missiles on thousands of cities in Russia, China and Eastern Europe, preempting any possible counter, and involving the death of 600 million, according to the answer to a question which only Ellsberg thought to ask, an insanity which according to Ellsberg remains unchanged policy at this moment, a disgraceful extension of the World War II change in war tactics well detailed in his book where civilian populations became primary targets of German then British and finally American bombing from above, a strategy of ruthless extermination of innocent bystanders of government warmongering and diplomatic clumsiness which continue to this day and on the nuclear level involve the same insane plans which research has now shown would amount to the complete destruction of human life in nuclear winter and starvation,

Asleep at the switch? Daniel Ellsberg needs you to wake up and do something before it is too late to save all of us on earth

a dire prospect which seemed to run counter to Ellsberg’s fluent bonhomie in retailing it to a packed audience in Barnes and Noble’s underground book talk room of mostly gray haired male shut ins from the look of them, so we asked him why he seemed so inordinately cheerful when predicting our extinction, was it because he felt our luck would hold, or that the absurdity of the generals’ thinking was so outrageous that one could only laugh, or was it because he personally was due to leave the planet anyway soon, or was it to make his dire message palatable enough that people would listen and act, or was it that he had faith that the intelligence of his critique would prevail when intelligence hadn’t had any effect for fifty years, to which he replied in public and afterwards that he had no faith that intelligence would hold sway in the future any more than it had in the past, though he still had dwindling hope that things would work out, and he did not want to seem hysterical though in fact that was appropriate, and his smiles otherwise only reflected the presence of his wife and other family who had come in support, but that his real feeling was one of what Martin Luther King called “the fierce urgency of now”, and that it was up to us to wake up and do something about it now before it was too late, to be the “silence breakers” in the same way as the women who were now coming forward to expose the vulgar and criminal depredations of the Weinsteins of the world, to the great surprise of the many men to whom they had never confided their oppression in the past, though looking around the room full of gray hairs

Among thew handful of young people listening to Ellsberg’s appeal were two of his grandchildren, but where were the rest of his audience needed to save us from his prediction of nuclear doom?

one wondered if he would have any more success in breaking the denialist apathy of the bulk of the democracy in which we live than other intelligent critics of the status quo have had even though the legendary whistle blower may be sounding the greatest warning in history.

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Dec 4 Mon Met: Society and Fashion Photographs by Adolf de Meyer

Patron of the avant-garde, Count Etienne de Beaumont, in his Paris townhouse, scene of legendary masquerade balls "of unsurpassed magnifience" attended by artists such as Cocteau, Picasso, and Man Ray c1923, gelatin silver print. Adolf de Meyer (American [born France], 1868–1946). Etienne de Beaumont (detail), ca. 1923. Gelatin silver print, 9 5/16 x 7 5/16 in. (23.7 x 18.6 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Paul F. Walter, 2008 (2009.460.7)

Patron of the avant-garde, Count Etienne de Beaumont, in his Paris townhouse, scene of legendary masquerade balls “of unsurpassed magnificence” attended by artists such as Cocteau, Picasso, and Man Ray c1923, gelatin silver print. Adolf de Meyer (American [born France], 1868–1946). Etienne de Beaumont (detail), ca. 1923. Gelatin silver print, 9 5/16 x 7 5/16 in. (23.7 x 18.6 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Paul F. Walter, 2008 (2009.460.7)

Brilliance of Slow Photography
Unless you look for it you may pass by this gem of an exhibition in the Howard Gilman Gallery, the first gallery on the right on the second floor of the Met (take the elevators at the small southern entrance up to the great corridor of the B. Gerald Cantor Sculpture Gallery now wholly taken over by Rodin) but like a backwater off a broad and turbulent river, you’ll find a singular oasis of calmness and depth which will transport you if you pay it careful attention into a different artistic universe, one of exquisite finesse and timeless aesthetic at the peak of what one might label ‘slow photography’, the period between 1900 and the 1930s in which the aristocratic, gay, Paris-born de Meyer flourished as a master of still lifes, portraits of his high society friends (including here is a serpent long Josephine Baker from 1925) and eventually after the start of World War I in New York trailblazing fashion exposures which graced the pages of Vogue, Harpers Bazaar and other clothing bibles of the time with such extraordinary beauty that they appear to occupy a higher realm than the temporary preoccupations of the text, his images early admired by Stieglitz eventually driving Cecil Beaton to exclaim that De Moyer had created “a new universe”, using tricks such as a light bulb under a model’s skirt or draping gauze over the camera, which can here be seen in copies of the magazine displayed in the floor cabinet of this essential exhibition, mounted by curator Beth Saunders from the Met’s own collection, including his 1912 series of the then scandalously sexy Ballets Russes Afternoon of a Faun by Nijinsky and Debussy, plus one of the seven copies left of the 1914 edition of the handcrafted book of thirty collotypes that resulted, though none of the images on the walls here are very erotic, or sensational in any way, only repaying quiet attention and contemplation to yield their virtues fully otherwise hidden from the impatient, here joined as well by his early experiment in autochrome color in 1907 featuring Tamara Karsavina of the Baller Russe, originally as a colored glass plate which has to be illuminated from behind, but here as a facsimile transparency, still with a rather special effect, but like all of these aesthetically resonant works its real quality is only apparent if you gaze upon it for a significant time.

De Meyer tried autochrome at its inception in `1907 in this study of Tamara Karsavina of the Ballets Russe at an English estate, and the colored glass plate is approximated in the exhibition with a transparency.

De Meyer tried autochrome at its inception in `1907 in this study of Tamara Karsavina of the Ballets Russe at an English estate, and the colored glass plate is approximated in the exhibition with a transparency.

The illuminated stability and beauty of de Meyer's work for New York's Harpers Bazaar is only fully apparent in the exhibition

The illuminated stability and beauty of de Meyer’s work for New York’s Harpers Bazaar is only fully apparent in the exhibition

Quicksilver Brilliance: Adolf de Meyer Photographs at the Met’s Howard Gilman Gallery (852)

A member of the “international set” in fin-de-siècle Europe, Baron Adolf de Meyer (1868–1946) was also a pioneering art, portrait, and fashion photographer, known for creating images that transformed reality into a beautiful fantasy. The “quicksilver brilliance” that characterized de Meyer’s art led fellow photographer Cecil Beaton to dub him the “Debussy of the Camera.”

Opening December 4 at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Quicksilver Brilliance: Adolf de Meyer Photographs will be the first museum exhibition devoted to the artist in more than 20 years and the first ever at The Met. Some 40 works, drawn entirely from The Met collection, will reveal the impressive breadth of his career.

The exhibition will include dazzling portraits of well-known figures of his time: the American socialite Rita de Acosta Lydig; art patron and designer Count Étienne de Beaumont; aristocrat and society hostess Lady Ottoline Morrell; and celebrated entertainer Josephine Baker, among others.

A highlight of the presentation will be an exceptional book—one of only seven known copies—documenting Nijinsky’s scandalous 1912 ballet L’Après-Midi d’un Faune. This rare album represents de Meyer’s great success in capturing the choreography of dance, a breakthrough in the history of photography. Also on view will be the artist’s early snapshots made in Japan, experiments with color processes, and inventive fashion photographs.

Born in Paris and educated in Germany, de Meyer was of obscure aristocratic German-Jewish and Scottish ancestry. He and his wife, Olga Caracciolo, goddaughter of Edward VII, were at the center of London’s café society.
After starting in photography as an amateur, de Meyer gained recognition as a leading figure of Pictorialism and a member of the photographic society known as the Linked Ring Brotherhood in London. Alfred Stieglitz exhibited de Meyer’s work in his Little Galleries of the Photo-Secession and published his images as photogravures in his influential journal Camera Work.

At the outbreak of World War I, de Meyer settled in the United States and applied his distinctive vision to fashion as the first staff photographer at Vogue and Vanity Fair, and later at Harper’s Bazaar, helping to define the genre during the interwar period.

The exhibition was organized by Beth Saunders, Assistant Curator in The Met’s Department of Photographs.
The exhibition will be featured on the Museum’s website, as well as on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Exhibition Dates:
December 4, 2017–March 18, 2018
Exhibition Location:
The Met Fifth Avenue, Floor 2, The Howard Gilman Gallery, Gallery 852

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Nov 30 Thu 7-9pm The ‘Doomed Earth’ Controversy – NYU Journalism Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute 7th Floor Commons 20 Cooper Square, NY

The ‘Doomed Earth’ Controversy – NYU Journalism
journalism.nyu.edu
The author of the controversial New York magazine cover story about worst-case climate scenarios in conversation with a prominent critic

The ‘Doomed Earth’ Controversy

November 30th, 2017
7:00-9:00PM
Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute
7th Floor Commons
20 Cooper Square, NY

Kavli Conversations

Kavli Conversations are hosted by NYU’s Science, Health and Environmental Reporting Program with support from the Kavli Foundation. Events are open to the public. Webcast will begin at 7:30pm.

Speakers

David Wallace-Wells is a features editor at New York magazine and the former deputy editor of the Paris Review. In addition to climate, he has written recently about gene editing and honeybee die-offs.

Michael Mann is a climatologist and the director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University. His books include The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars, Dire Predictions, and The Madhouse Effect

Moderator

Robert Lee Hotz is a science writer at the Wall Street Journal and a Distinguished Writer in Residence at the Carter Institute of Journalism at NYU. He is the president of the Alicia Patterson Foundation, which funds independent journalism projects around the world, and an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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Nov 29 Wed 6pm-10pm Inspired by firefly illuminated courtyard scene in Festa di Laurea (Graduation Party) film by Pupi Avati, Lucciola opens at 621 Amsterdam Ave

The spirit of Bologna moves Lucciola in cuisine and art in memory of the passion and soul of the actor Nik Novecento, who embodied the values of Bologna in his courage, and kindness, though he died young and his friends have created a place in New York where he could have come and spent time.

New York (November 2017) LUCCIOLA opens its doors at 6:00 p.m. this Wednesday, November 29th, 2017

LUCCIOLA is the exciting new Italian restaurant in Manhattan¹s UWS neighborhood launched by Michele Casadei Massari, Alberto Ghezzi and Gianluca Capozzi, with co-founders Erica Monti and Luca Filicori.

LUCCIOLA is an homage to their hometown of Bologna ­ its cuisine, its cinematic history, a city of dreams brought to life here in New York City. Lucciola is the Italian word for Firefly, that wonderful insect that glows in the dark.

The dishes, the atmosphere, and the overall concept of LUCCIOLA specifically takes inspiration from the film ³Festa di Laurea,² directed by Pupi Avati. The restaurant reflects the nostalgic and romantic mood of Bologna that Avati depicted, especially his famous courtyard scene where the simple illumination was reminiscent of fireflies. LUCCIOLA is located down the street from Central Park, where the most fireflies can be found in the city.

LUCCIOLA is dedicated to the actor in Avati¹s film, Nik Novecento, who embodied the values of Bologna, from his passion, soul, courageousness, and kindness. Novecento died at a young age and to commemorate his memory they have created a place in New York where he could have come and spent time.

LUCCIOLA also provides a new space for Italian artists to express themselves: Marco Gallotta is the creator and designer of the wallpaper and artworks; Marina Vanni e Cristina Guidoni from StudioEmporioHome (based in Savigno, Bologna) designed “Madre Lucciola” lamp inspired and in memory of Nik Novecento.

The LUCCIOLA menu features a front page replica of Corriere della Sera from February 1st, 1975, in which legendary film director Pier Paolo Pasolini published one of his last pieces just months before he was murdered. Pasolini utilized “lucciole” as a symbol and metaphor of part of our society.

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Nov 29 Wed 6-7.30pm NYAM Medical Sleuthing Panel of Three Writers

Tuesday 11/29
The Sherlock Holmes of Non-Fiction Medical Writers
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Speaker: D.T. Max, staff writer at The New Yorker; Lisa Sanders, MD, internist and professor at Yale School of Medicine; Randi Hutter Epstein, MD, MPH, adjunct professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and a lecturer at Yale University

Medical diagnosis is detective work. In his book, The Family Who Couldn’t Sleep, D.T. Max unfolds a medical mystery of a noble Venetian family whose offspring suffered from fatal insomnia. Physician and New York Times columnist Lisa Sanders takes readers on a biweekly journey of medical investigation in the Diagnosis series, which inspired the hit T.V. series House MD starring Hugh Laurie. Academy Fellow Randi Hutter Epstein moderates a discussion with these two award-winning writers, exploring not only the mysteries behind diagnosis but the process of turning medical sleuthing into riveting narratives.

About the Speakers

D.T. Max is a staff writer at The New Yorker. He is the author of The Family That Couldn’t Sleep: A Medical Mystery, which Natalie Angier, writing in the New York Times Book Review, called “gripping, cleanly written, cannily plotted and elegantly educational…. The book brims with great tales.” He also wrote Every Love Story Is A Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace, published in 2012, which was a New York Times bestseller. He lives in New Jersey.

Lisa Sanders is an internist on the faculty of Yale School of Medicine and teaches in the Primary Care Internal Medicine residency program there. In her spare time she writes the biweekly Diagnosis column for the New York Times Magazine. Her column was the inspiration for the hit television series House MD and she was an advisor for the show. She is the author of the New York Times best seller, Every Patient Tells a Story. Before Sanders came to medical school she was an Emmy award winning producer for CBS News. She is currently at work on a book on diagnostic error.

Randi Hutter Epstein, MD, MPH is a medical writer, adjunct professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and a lecturer at Yale University. She earned a BS from The University of Pennsylvania, M.S. from the Graduate School of Journalism, Columbia University; an MD.from Yale University School of Medicine, and an MPH from the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University. Randi worked as a medical writer for the London bureau of The Associated Press and was the London bureau chief of Physicians’ Weekly. Her articles have appeared in the New York Times, The Washington Post, The Daily Telegraph, The Guardian, Parents, More, among other newspapers and magazines. Get Me Out: A History of Childbirth from the Garden of Eden to the Sperm Bank is her first book.

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Nov 20 Mon David Hockney, 80, Major Retrospective at the Met

Large Interior - by David Hockney

Large Interior – by David Hockney

For nearly 60 years, David Hockney (British, born 1937) has pursued a singular career with a love for painting and its intrinsic challenges. This major retrospective—the exhibition’s only North American venue—will honor the artist in his 80th year by presenting his most iconic works and key moments of his career from 1960 to the present.

Working in a wide range of media with equal measures of wit and intelligence, Hockney has examined, probed, and questioned how to capture the perceived world of movement, space, and time in two dimensions. The exhibition will offer a grand overview of the artist’s achievements across all media, including painting, drawing, photography, and video. From his early experiments with modernist abstraction and mid-career experiments with illusion and realism, to his most recent, jewel-toned landscapes, Hockney has consistently explored the nature of perception and representation with both intellectual rigor and sheer delight in the act of looking.

The exhibition is made possible in part by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Jay Pritzker Foundation, the Jane and Robert Carroll Fund, and the Aaron I. Fleischman and Lin Lougheed Fund.

It is supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

It is organized collaboratively by Tate Britain, London; the Centre Pompidou, Paris; and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 999

Exhibition Dates: November 27, 2017–February 25, 2018
Exhibition Location: Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Galleries, Gallery 999

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Nov 18 Sat 7pm Filling a great hall magnificently: 550 Singers including 300 schoolchildren in Mahler’s Eighth and Rollo Dilworth Premiere at Carnegie Hall

Magnificent Choral Event

Magnificent Choral Event

Mahler Symphony No 8 and Bound for Glory by Dilworth

Mahler Symphony No 8 and Bound for Glory by Dilworth

Resounding triumph of sound and musicality
Last night it was hard to imagine a more splendidly rich and yet softly beautiful sound filling Carnegie Hall than the combined forces of the orchestra, the Canterbury choir on the great stage and the ranks of the many school children filling two levels of the fabled hall above the heads of the parquet audience as they played and sang the first part of Mahler’s tremendous Eighth, yet the two major works which bookended the first section of this most huge and renowned of Mahler’s works in this extraordinary concert were perhaps the most pleasing of the evening, namely the premiere of Rollo Dilworth’s Bound For Glory, a set of works based on folk songs and the most famous spirituals of his African-American heritage, featuring his superb orchestration of This Train is Bound for Glory and four other works which proved Dilworth’s amazing grace in substituting classical music’s expansive armory of violins, brass and timpani and a massed choir for the more basic instruments and small human congregations that gave them birth, revealing how they ranked with the greatest music in any form, and then after the intermission the long finale of the evening was the second part of the Eighth, Mahler’s scoring of the final scene from Goethe’s Faust, Part II, an abridgment which is still huge in power and length and yet which like Rollo Dilworth’s masterwork also spoke to the ear and heart more convincingly than the at times overly dramatic first part of the Eighth, completing Mahler’s seminal masterpiece whose premiere was the high point of his career, featuring a quieter and more accessible appeal possibly because Mahler was the greatest opera conductor of his day, and also perhaps because it is generally less demanding of the soloists in the upper register, and possibly also because conductor Jonathan de Vries seemed to have had the vast numbers of soloists, instrumentalists and voices high and low in hand more completely than in the great but very demanding first part of the symphony, but whatever the reasons for any differences certainly the upshot was that all three works made for what has to be one of the most stirring, interesting and satisfying evenings that the great acoustics of the hall have served for some time. – AL

CANTERBURY CELEBRATES 65 TH ANNIVERSARY WITH PERFORMANCE OF MAHLER’S EIGHTH SYMPHONY AND WORLD PREMIERE OF WORK BY ROLLO DILWORTH – 550 SINGERS INCLUDING 300 CHILDREN WILL PERFORM

For the first time in its 65-year history, Canterbury Choral Society, under the baton of conductor Jonathan De Vries, has commissioned a new choral work by a prominent American contemporary composer, Rollo Dilworth.

On November 18, 2017 at 7pm Canterbury Choral Society and Monmouth Civic Chorus will perform Gustav Mahler’s magnificent Eighth Symphony in Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage at Carnegie Hall in New York. They will be joined by over 300 children from 9 schools and churches in the City.

Composer Rollo Dilworth

Composer Rollo Dilworth

In addition, composer Rollo Dilworth has written a choral piece, “Bound for Glory”especially for the occasion.

“This is a five-movement work that celebrates the influences of African musicaltraditions on Am erican folk tunes, European melodies and the African America spiritual. These genres of music communicate the common themes of faith, hope and perseverance,” says Dilworth.

Gustav Mahler’s Eighth Symphony, known as “The Symphony of a Thousand”, requires elaborate staging and a double adult chorus. The children provide the angelic “heavenly” voices.

“Canterbury has a long history of children singing in choral concerts. We commissioned Rollo Dilworth’s work to commemorate that tradition” says Conductor Jonathan De Vries. “The idea of a Faustian journey of redemption is where this concept first began. The feeling of a heavenly journey in both Mahler and Dilworth’s work is exciting to consider. “

Soloists participating are: Angela Fout, Jennifer Grimaldi and Jolle Greenleaf, Sopra nos, Fredrika Brillembourg and Sara Murphy, Mezzo-Sopranos; John Matthew Myers, Tenor, Sidney Outlaw, Bass-Baritone and Matthew Anchel, Bass.

CANTERBURY CELEBRATES 65TH ANNIVERSARY WITH PERFORMANCE OF MAHLER’S EIGHTH SYMPHONY AND WORLD PREMIERE OF WORK BY ROLLO DILWORTH 550 SINGERS INCLUDING 300 CHILDREN WILL PERFORM

CANTERBURY CELEBRATES 65TH ANNIVERSARY WITH PERFORMANCE OF MAHLER’S EIGHTH SYMPHONY AND WORLD PREMIERE OF WORK BY ROLLO DILWORTH 550 SINGERS INCLUDING 300 CHILDREN WILL PERFORM

A 300-voice children’s choir will join in the performance. Young choristers from five New York area schools, and youth choral groups from four churches will sing. The schools include Brearley, Spence, St. Hilda’s and St. Hugh’s, Trevor Day, Kaufman Music Center; the churches are the Church of the Heavenly Rest, St. Bartholomew’s, Trinity Church Wall Street, and New Amsterdam Boys and Girls Choir in New York City.

Mahler’s Eighth Symphony is in two movements. The first is a setting of the 9 th Century Latin hymn Veni Creator Spiritus. The second movement is sung in German and is taken from Goethe’s Faust Part Two, published posthumously in 1832.

Almost all of the Eighth Symphony was created by Austrian composer Gustav Mahler in the summer of 1906. Inspiration came to him quite suddenly in his studio. “It was a vision that struck me like lightning—-the whole immediately before my eyes. I had only to write it down, as though it has just been dictated to me,” he wrote. Mahler not only composed new music for the medieval hymn, but conceived of the conceptual link to Goethe’s Faust, joining the texts together in an innovative symphony that borrowed elements from sacred oratorio and dramatic opera.

Tickets for Canterbury Choral Society’s performance of Mahler’s Eighth Symphony are now on sale at the Carnegie Hall Box Office at 57th Street and Seventh Avenue, at www.carnegiehall.org , or by calling Carnegie Charge at 212-247- 7800. Prices range from $35 to $100.

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Nov 17 Fri Molly Barnes Presents Dealer George Billis of LA and NYC and Red Dot Art Fair in Miami

Bruce Everett

The George Billis Gallery is an exhibition space with locations in New York City and Los Angeles.

After establishing a successful contemporary art gallery in New York, George Billis opened his Los Angeles gallery in 2004. With galleries in Chelsea and Culver City, George Billis Gallery provides a dynamic exchange of contemporary artists between the art centers of New York and Los Angeles. The gallery shows painting, photography, sculpture, and mixed media works and is dedicated predominantly to exhibiting emerging to mid-career artists with a focus on Southern California artists.

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Nov 16 Thu Noon-2pm Molly Barnes Presents Marilyn Church, Painter and Court Sketch Artist, at Roger Smith

EDGEOFSILENCE38X56ACRYLICMARILYNCHURCH

EDGEOFSILENCE38X56ACRYLICMARILYNCHURCH

Nov 16 Thu Noon-2pm Molly Barnes Presents Marilyn Church, Court Sketch Artist and Painter, at Roger Smith

My focus and fascination is the abstraction of the figure – a continuous theme throughout my career as an artist.
The figure and its emotional impact always resonated for me as a courtroom artist and found its way into my work as a fine artist.
But in my painting and mixed media works, I am freed from any boundaries and am more open to intuition, dream images and improvisation.
In this process of discovery, a narrative eventually emerges, however illusive it appears. It is often cloaked in mystery, eroticism and ambiguity.

Marilyn Church , May 2015

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Nov 14 Tue 10am AMNH Our Senses: An Immersive Experience

The AMNH will play with your senses

The AMNH will play with your senses

Fun challenges can teach how the brain can be fooled

In the Wavy Room, the floor and walls seem to be less than flat, but they are not

The tricks our senses play upon our minds may be the most interesting aspect of this diverting and thorough survey of how the senses form our perceptions with the help of the brain, in particular a display towards the end of the 11 room array of different activities from Seeing, Detecting, Hearing to Touch and Smelling where the Wavy Room, whose walls and floor are covered with a network of distorting lines that will disorient your sense of balance, leads into “Correcting”, another ‘exploration room’, a gallery of exhibits which “demonstrate the role of the brain in processing sensory information to construct its view of the world”, where one wall display presents an image of a checkerboard partly in the shadow of an object,

According to Rob DeSalle, the curator of the AMNH’s Or Senses. squares A and B are the same shade and if we think not, our brain is playing a trick – but our camera seems to prove him wrong!

where the alternating squares are all in fact the same alternating tonal density of light or dark, but where your brain will insist on interpreting one dark square in the shadow as lighter than another dark square outside the shadow, and despite the statement accompanying it which explains the phenomenon is an illusion, you will find your brain will refuse to correct the impression, however long you look, but don’t make the mistake of thinking that curator Rob Desalle of Invertebrate Zoology has got it wrong, but instead accept it as powerful evidence of how much the brain can distort our understanding of what we are witnessing, as it attempts to correct a sensory impression by creating a misleading one,

Rob should know – he oversaw the Brain:The Inside Story earlier – but your brain may still challenge his guidance that square A is the same color as Square B!

even though your camera shows otherwise, which together with other examples in this room will teach why eye witness accounts are so often mistaken in court cases and must not be treated as gospel, a theme which is taken up on the Museum’s science website for kids, OLogy, where there is now Trip Up Your Brain, a feature on optical illusions and what they reveal about the human brain and our evolutionary past.

Perhaps this shot will persuade you that your brain is changing what you perceive to suit your preconceptions - the separate piece matching A placed on the B square now seems to match its darker tone.

Perhaps this shot will persuade you that your brain is changing what you perceive to suit your preconceptions – the separate piece matching A placed on the B square now seems to match its darker tone.

(AMNH:) Every day, we perceive the world around us through some or all of our senses—including sight, smell, hearing, touch, taste, and balance. Every ring of the alarm clock, whiff of breakfast, or step on a cold tile floor—all are detected by specialized sensory cells that send nerve signals to your brain. But as it turns out, for humans “reality” isn’t ever exactly what it seems to be. In an upcoming highly experiential exhibition at the Museum, funhouse-like spaces will dare visitors to trust their senses—then show how or why what we perceive is not simply what is occurring around us.

Our Senses: An Immersive Experience delves into how our brains, adapted over millennia to help our ancestors survive their environments, work with sensory organs to shape and reframe our perceptions of everyday encounters. And it reveals how until recently in our evolutionary history, humans have been oblivious to nature’s other ubiquitous signals, including UV light, infrared sounds, and electrical fields. With the advent of new technologies, scientists now know those signals are all around us—just not perceptible to us through our senses alone.

Our Senses will let visitors explore eleven interactive galleries designed to test our perceptions. A room with changing lights will reveal a series of different images depending on which light—red, blue, or green—shines at any given moment. Another space—this time in black and white—will let visitors discover what happens when our senses disagree: the eyes will see walls and a floor that appear to curve and ripple but the feet will feel a flat surface beneath. (Some visitors may feel off balance, but will be able to bypass the gallery if they prefer.)

Other exhibition highlights include a garden that can be explored through the eyes of a bee or a butterfly, revealing what other animals see when they encounter flowering plants; an audio collage challenging visitors to test their skill at tracking individual sounds, a real-time demonstration of how your brain’s primary task is to sort through the stimulating world around you and select the right information on which to focus your attention; and a variety of experiences that showcase how our brains are wired to prioritize certain signals and focus on particular cues and details, such as movement or human faces. A smell test will invite visitors to unpack the fragrance notes in a complex scent, since what we perceive as a particular odor is actually a symphony of smells. A section on attention will focus on how seemingly unrelated information can shape what you see and hear—and how, when focusing on one item, other, obvious items may be missed. Other areas of the exhibition will delve into how our brain works to create our perception of “reality” by filling in gaps, resolving conflicts, correcting errors, and using scraps of information to trigger memories.

In addition, a live presentation will address why our senses are essential to our survival, how the senses and world views of other species differ from ours, and what’s truly unique about human perception, including sensory integration, language, art, and music.

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Nov 13 Mon 7pm Tina Brown at Barnes and Noble 86th St

Tina Brown on Vanity Fair and NYC in the Eighties

Tina Brown on Vanity Fair and NYC in the Eighties

Tina Brown
The Vanity Fair Diaries: 1983 – 1992
Band N Author Event (Biography)
Monday November 13, 2017 7:00 PM
Lex/East 86 St

Tina Brown’s delicious daily diaries kept throughout her eight spectacular years as editor-in-chief of Vanity Fair provide an incendiary portrait of the flash and dash and power brokering of the excessive Eighties in New York and Hollywood. Here are the inside stories of Vanity Fair scoops and covers that sold millions as Brown triumphantly reinvented the failing magazine.

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Nov 13 Mon 10 am–noon Norwegian Edvard Munch Reassessed at Met Breuer (Nov 15-Feb 4)

Edvard Munch. Self Portrait between the Clock and the Bed, 1940–43. Oil on canvas. Munch Museum, Oslo.

Edvard Munch. Self Portrait between the Clock and the Bed, 1940–43. Oil on canvas. Munch
Museum, Oslo.

Edvard Munch’s Career is Reassessed in Met Breuer Exhibition

Exhibition Dates:
November 15, 2017–February 4, 2018
Exhibition Location:
The Met Breuer, Floor 3

Although Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863–1944) attained notoriety early in his career for his haunting depictions of human anxiety and alienation that reflected modern experience, he believed that his artistic breakthrough occurred around 1913 at the age of 50.Throughout his career, Munch regularly revisited subjects from his earlier years, exploring them with renewed inspiration and intensity. Self Portrait: Between the Clock and the Bed (1940–43) was one of his final such works and it serves as a lens to reassess Munch’s oeuvre. Opening November 15 at The Met Breuer, the exhibition Edvard Munch: Between the Clock and the Bed will feature 43 of the artist’s compositions created over a span of six decades, including 16 self-portraits and works that have never before been seen in the United States.
The exhibition is made possible by Leonard A. Lauder.

It is supported by an Indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and The Munch Museum, Oslo.

Exhibition Overview

The thematic arrangement of the exhibition will reveal the frequency with which Munch revisited and reworked certain subjects. It will present him as an artist who was as revolutionary in the 20th century, as he was when he made a name for himself in the Symbolist era. Major themes and motifs of Munch’s last paintings can be traced back to his earlier works. Displaying his early and late works together allows visitors to identify innovations in composition, treatment, and technique.
The first canvas in the exhibition—Self Portrait: Between the Clock and the Bed—is also one of the last works the artist painted. It will serve as a touchstone and guide to the other works on view. This remarkable painting shows the artist’s bedroom, with a door opening to the studio beyond. The artist stands emotionless between the grandfather clock, which—having no face or hands—exists outside of time, and the bed, in which the span of a human’s life takes place.
Fifteen other self-portraits—a category to which Munch returned often—follow the artist’s path from youth to old age. These fascinating “self-scrutinies” as Munch called them are, by turns, documentary, confessional, psychological, and fictionalized.
Seven works in the exhibition will be shown in the United States for the first time: Lady in Black (1891); Puberty (1894); Jealousy (1907); Death Struggle (1915); Man with Bronchitis (1920); Self-Portrait with Hands in Pockets (1925-26), and Ashes (1925). Also on view will be Sick Mood at Sunset, Despair (1892)—the earliest depiction and compositional genesis of The Scream, one of the most recognizable images in modern art—which is being displayed outside of Europe for only the second time in its history.
The exhibition will include many deeply personal works from Munch’s own collection, now held by the Munch Museum, as well as works from institutions and private lenders from around the world. The paintings demonstrate Munch’s liberated, self-assured painting style as well as his technical abilities, including bravura brushwork, innovative compositional structures, the incorporation of visceral scratches and marks on the canvas, and his exceptional use of intense, vibrant color.

About the Artist

Born and raised in Norway, Edvard Munch was one of the most celebrated and controversial artists of his generation. With only brief formal training in painting, Munch was largely self-taught. He was a prolific artist, creating approximately 1,750 paintings, 18,000 prints, and 4,500 watercolors, in addition to sculpture, graphic art, theater design, and film. Munch was associated with the Symbolist and Expressionist movements and their legacies. He exhibited widely throughout Europe, affecting the trajectory of modernism in France, Germany, and Norway. His influence can be seen in the work of such artists as Georg Baselitz, Marlene Dumas, Katharina Grosse, Asger Jorn, Bridget Riley, and Jasper Johns, among others.
Credits

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Nov 6 Mon 10am–2pm Michelangelo, Divine Draftsman and Designer: Landmark Exhibition at Met (Nov 13 Mon, 2017–Feb 12 Mon, 2018)


How the Genius of Michelangelo Unfolded
Curator Carmen Bernbach took eight years to put together this unique exposition of how this most celebrated artist of the physically and spiritually sublime put it all together in his extraordinary 88 years, attaining the ideal of beauty so perfectly from prodigious inspiration in conception and drawing to execution in paint, marble and even verse, inspiring others with his designs to work with him or follow him as he achieved the greatest figure representations in history of male nudes, always his obsession as he loved and befriended the finest gentiluomini amici, or young gentlemen of the Florentine aristocracy, and fellow artists with work that redirected Western art toward more expression in a life that was ruled by mind and heart, including faith in God, for Michelangelo notoriously paid no attention to food or any other bodily appetite, according to contemporaries, as he shared his genius.

Description from the Met: Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer, on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art from November 13, 2017, through February 12, 2018, will present a stunning range and number of works by the artist: 128 of his drawings, 3 of his marble sculptures, his earliest painting, and his wood architectural model for a chapel vault. A substantial body of complementary works by his teachers, associates, pupils, and artists who were influenced by him or who worked in collaboration with him will also be displayed for comparison and context.

A towering genius in the history of Western art, Michelangelo was celebrated during his long life for the excellence of his disegno, the power of drawing and invention that provided the foundation for all of the arts. For his mastery of drawing, design, sculpture, painting, and architecture, he was called Il divino (“the divine one”) by his contemporaries. His powerful imagery and dazzling technical virtuosity transported viewers and imbued all of his works with a staggering force that continues to enthrall us today.

“This is an exceptionally rare opportunity to experience first-hand the unique genius of Michelangelo,” said Daniel H. Weiss, President and CEO of The Met. “The exhibition will display the magnificent beauty of Michelangelo’s works in order to deepen our understanding of his creative process.”

Selected from 50 public and private collections in the United States and Europe, the exhibition will bring together the largest group of original drawings by Michelangelo ever assembled for public display. Many of the drawings rank among the greatest works of draftsmanship produced. Extraordinary and rare international loans will include the complete series of masterpiece drawings he created for his friend Tommaso de’Cavalieri and a monumental cartoon for his last fresco in the Vatican Palace.

Dr. Carmen C. Bambach, curator of the exhibition, commented: “This selection of more than 200 works will show that Michelangelo’s imagery and drawings still speak with an arresting power today. Five hundred years seem to melt away in looking at his art.”

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Nov 4 Sat 3-5pm Harney and Sons Present Tip Top Athleteas at SoHo house, 433 Broome St

With the huge array of choice tea blends on the wall, the three globes of AthleTeas are lined up for tasting on the counter of a crowded store

With the huge array of choice tea blends on the wall, the three globes of AthleTeas are lined up for tasting on the counter of a crowded store


Tea lovers gather at Harney’s to taste Athleteas for athletes, latest three of over 250 blends

Harney’s in Soho is a rich resource for tea lovers, presenting for tasting, purchase or sit down enjoyment leaves from sources in India, China and Ceylon and as far flung as Rwanda or even Italy (dried olive leaves from the South) mixed into over two hundred and fifty inventive but rich and always tasteful blends from Sally’s Secret black tea with its notes of Black Pepper and Rosepetal to the distinctly earthy but still delicate Rwanden RuGeri, a tea benefiting from the slow processing possible in Rwanda which escapes the humidity and heat of India, to Osmanthus Oolong, with its tiny flowers from Fujian Province in China turned into a heap of particles which yield such a dense tea that it can be infused more than once as its flavor develops.

Tasting at Harney's demands full attention to the subtleties of expert blending

Tasting at Harney’s demands full attention to the subtleties of expert blending

This afternoon’s event marked the new partnership between Harney’s and Dr Mara Smith, a specialist in tutoring Olympic athletes how to train their bodies with the right mental attitude to reach peak performance, by presenting three different new ‘Athleteas’ for sampling at the tasting counter of Harney’s long and recently efficiently remodeled retail space which is on the south side of Broome Street just East of Broadway. The middle of the extensive wooden counter featured three glowing rosy round globes of AthleTea, one for ‘performance’ with caffeine (orange mango) and one for ‘performance’ without caffeine (Get Your Passion Berry AthleTea) and one for ‘recovery’ without caffeine (the soothing Go to Goji).

Dr. Mara Smith designed her new blends for Harneys to enhance athletes mindfulness of past and future performance

Dr. Mara Smith designed her new blends for Harneys to enhance athletes mindfulness of past and future performance

All this according to Mara, a warm, lively woman in sturdy black spectacles who believes that tea drinking is the way for high performing athletes “to carve out time for reflection on past progress and to focus forward” on future accomplishment, and is working with many athletes who now wish to move from health drinks toward tea. Of course this should appeal as well to all healthy people who are not actually athletes, she says, since as the Nike saying has it “If you have a body you are an athlete!”

Apart from the large canisters of specialty teas that line the wall behind the serving counter in a solid block of 250 teas, Harney’s has a small space at the back for people to sit with tea or even coffee (recently added) and a slew of intriguing extras to buy lining the wall opposite, including “Homesick” candles to remind one of home, tumblers with inscriptions like NEW YORK HOME, decorated mugs especially for “Little Miss Busy”, “Mr Grumpy”, “Little Miss Chatterbox” and other children, attractive leaf motif tote bags, and black baseball caps with legends front and rear (“Hello with “Goodbye”, or “Books” with “Join The Club” , or “This is Tea” and “Harneys”.)

Tea consultant Mila presents the three AthleTeas now available to make you pause and be mindful of past and future considerations in your athletic progress

Tea enthusiast Michele presents the three AthleTeas now available to make you pause and be mindful of past and future considerations in your athletic progress

Mousing the Google map of Harney’s location on Broome just East of Broadway in Soho (take the Lex subway to Spring) and you notice that there is no listing for thousands of Yelp or Google reviews as for other much less notable places. Yet there are often crowds outside the doors when it opens at 10.30am daily (closes 6.30pm)

Evidently Harneys is discreetly British in style in selling itself as well as its tea by relying on word of mouth to advertise its top tea level social and commercial presence, for as the cap says, truly “This is Tea, Harneys”. Yet in only seven years it has established this, still the only offshoot of its home base in Millerton, in upstate New York, as indeed the tea place in New York par excellence.

Emeric Harney has remodeled the store into a beautifully efficient system for selling his top teas, and plans to expand the seating for those who wish to sample them along with crumbly scones with clotted cream right then and there

Emeric Harney has remodeled the store into a beautifully efficient system for selling his top teas, and plans to expand the seating for those who wish to sample them along with crumbly scones with clotted cream right then and there

One can only hope that, as Emeric Harney the third generation owner of this flagship in fashionable Soho now crowded with visitors from foreign countries where tea is often more established than here, says is the plan, Harneys expands the size and comfort of its restricted seating area to a level consonant with its leadership of what one hopes will be a continuing advance of the more enlightened and healthy alternative to coffee in too caffeine addicted New York City.

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PR notification: Attention fun fit New Yorkers!
Harney & Sons is hosting a launch party for their NEW Athletea Saturday before the New York marathon!
…and we want YOU to come
Tea masters Harney & Sons will be filling your cups with fitness-minded tea blends.
Food provided by the grand French Lafayette Café & Bakery
Special guest Dr. Mara Smith, founder of AthleteMinder and mental strength consultant to Olympic and World medal-winning athletes.

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